344 search results for "rape culture"

Today in rape culture: The Trump video isn’t about the saucy language

[Content note for sexual assault]

On Friday, the Washington Post published a heretofore unseen video from 2005 in which Donald Trump, in the Access Hollywood bus on the way to a cameo on “Days of Our Lives,” gives us a good look at how much he really respects women. Talking with Billy Bush, into a mic that he didn’t know was hot (Donald, are you sure that a malfunctioning microphone isn’t the best thing for you at this point?), he makes it clear that no, women aren’t more than objects to be evaluated, disparaged, and abused at his whim.

Today in rape culture: So Brock Turner is a free man

[Trigger warning for rape]

Well, that was quick.

In a development that definitely disappoints but doesn’t surprise, Brock Turner was released from jail Friday, a stunningly short three months into an already pathetic six-month sentence for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman behind a dumpster. Early release for good behavior, you know. Nice boy that he is, who just made some bad decisions this one time.

Western Ohio… he’s yours now.

Today in rape culture: Pre-college edition

Because we needed another reminder that a promising young athlete’s bright potential mustn’t be dimmed by the consequences of a rape conviction: 18-year-old rising collegian David Becker was charged with two counts of rape and one count of indecent assault and battery after sexually assaulting two unconscious classmates at a house party in 2015. The district attorney recommended two years in prison, but Palmer District Court Judge Estes ordered a continuation without finding for two years. During his two years of probation, Becker has to avoid drugs and alcohol, submit to evaluation for sex-offender treatment, and stay away from his two victims. He won’t have to register as a sex offender and won’t have a conviction on his record as long as he sticks to the terms of his probation, which is good for this community service-serving, college-bound, three-sport athlete, because, his lawyer said, “We all made mistakes when we were 17, 18, 19[.].”

Jian Ghomeshi, the CBC and Rape Culture

Guest Blogger: Andie from Inspiration Strikes. In The Kneecaps.

[Content Note: sexual abuse, harassment]

I’ve been wanting to get this guest post done and finished, but every time I turn around this story just keeps unravelling.

This week both my Twitter and Facebook feeds blew up with the news that the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation had quite suddenly cut ties with long-time radio host Jian Ghomeshi, citing information that had come to their attention which precluded their continued relationship.

VLOGGING – Rape Culture in Gaming?

Is rape culture a thing? Beyond the factually challenged fringe, most normal people would agree it’s impossible for sexual violence to flourish unless society’s culture condones and promotes it – not just through laws that force women to pay for their own rape kits if authorities think their dresses or drinking contributed to their victimisation, but also through media gatekeepers who slap films with NC-17 if they depict female pleasure, but merely give an R to films depicting violent female rape. So, is rape culture in gaming equally cause for concern?

Rape Culture in Action Round-Up

Pepe Le Pew assaults a woman he has stalked despite her repeated refusals of his attentions

A few links from the last few months: I’m sure most readers have seen more examples published recently, or know of examples personally. Please do add your links and, if you want/can, share your stories in the comments, because continuing documentation of these toxic social phenomena is crucial in persuading people that a problem actually exists, which is the first step in building momentum for reform.

NB: do not ignore the Moderator Note at the foot of this post when drafting your comment(s).

The report is out on Rolling Stone‘s handling of the UVA rape story, and it’s understandably awful

On November 19, 2014, Rolling Stone published a lengthy and damning piece on the handling of sexual assault on college campuses, centering around a University of Virginia student, pseudonymously identified as “Jackie,” and her alleged gang-rape by members of one of the school’s fraternities. It was striking and stomach-turning — the attack, the response from fellow students, the response (or, more accurately, lack thereof) by university administration depicted in that story. It was also, the world would later learn, almost entirely unsubstantiated. A new report by the Columbia School of Journalism, commissioned by Rolling Stone back in December, meticulously outlines those mistakes.

Q&A: Rape, documentary filmmaking and triggers…

Millennials, social media and damning federal investigations are reshaping rape culture’s topography, as more women push back against a culture that loves protecting rapists and vilifying victims. One survivor of childhood slut-shaming opted to make her experience public, posting her diary from childhood online. And after hearing from other women their harrowing encounters with rape culture and victim-blaming, she decided to try making a documentary about rape culture itself. This post stems from Feministe’s interview with the accidental feminist filmmaker behind Slut: A Documentary Film