Don’t pee on my leg and tell me it’s reproductive rights

A female doctor in a lab coat sits with a female patient, looking at a clipboard

Women aren’t stupid. (I mean, on average.) Over time, we’ve begun to vote, work, sign for our own credit cards, and helm blockbuster movies and society hasn’t collapsed under the weight of our unfettered ignorance. Certainly, given accurate information to work with, we’re capable of making decisions about our own bodies. We’re capable of deciding if we want to have kids, when we want to have kids, and how many kids we want to have. And that is precisely why so many groups lie their little asses off when the subject of reproductive health arises: because they want to be the ones making the decisions.

Her blog post throbbed with the disdain of a woman who’d never contemplated her own breasts

A dark-haired woman in a black dress looking at herself in a full-length mirror

I walked into the room with a confidence that would have been alluring on a more attractive woman but, unrelentingly average as I am, could only be read as arrogance. My oversized tank top skimmed over breast-shaped breasts, hiding feminine curves that still have to be mentioned even though you couldn’t even see them. I wore tight pants that said “workout,” stretched over a generous ass that said “work me out,” and he might have been tempted to take me up on my unmistakable offer had I not been, tragically, in my late thirties. Above my neck, there were other body parts.

Quick Hit: Nontoxic masculinity

Much like markers, masculinity comes in the toxic and the nontoxic kind. (Pointing out that fact is enough to enrage some guys into a lather.) At KatyKatiKate, Katie explains the concept, symptoms, and dangers of toxic masculinity. And she provides real-life and fictional examples of the non-toxic variety, ranging from the strong and physically imposing to the artistic and less imposing.

Stop scapegoating and alienating vulnerable people

Movie still from "The Perks of Being a Wallflower," set in a high school, with a young man in the foreground looking off into the distance as two young women stand in the near background, talking about him

People on all sides of the issue seem to be looking for some kind of solution to school shootings and mass shootings in general. Which is good. They’re doing that at the expense of innocent, vulnerable people. That’s bad. Pro-gun control, pro-WalkingUpNotOut, everyone is pinning this violence on people who had nothing to do with it, are already dealing with enough on their own, and are actively harmed by being saddled with that blame.

Why walking out is good, walking up is insufficient, reaching out is important, and nothing is ever, ever simple or easy

Students rally in front of the White House on March 14, 2018

Today, thousands of students across the country walked out of their schools to protest gun violence and demand legislation that will protect them from such. But some students are being discouraged from marching. The < "https://www.indystar.com/story/news/2018/03/13/school-shootings-inspire-new-movements-national-school-walkout-and-walk-up-not-out/420837002/">Walk Up Not Out movement tells kids that instead of walking out to protest gun violence, they should walk up to a lonely kid and be nice to them to “possibly prevent the unjustifiable heartache of hundreds of lives in the future.”

The idea that abruptly being nice to the lonely kid is the answer, and the only answer, to gun violence in schools is ridiculous. Here’s why.

Student who smeared bodily fluids on her roommate’s belongings gets special probation. Not included: Any other meaningful penalty.

Brianna Brochu appears in court to answer charges that she contaminated her then-roommate's belongings with bodily fluids

Brianna Brochu, who was expelled from the University of Hartford after contaminating her roommate’s belongings with blood, rancid food, and ass bacteria, has had her day in court. The verdict? Guilty of breach of peace and criminal mischief. The sentence? Two hundred hours of community service, and if she’s a good girl, her charges will be thrown out and she won’t have a criminal record for rubbing used tampons on her roommate’s backpack and (as she claimed on social media but later Read more →

Resources for students who choose to march

Stoneman Douglas High School senior Emma Gonzalez, surrounded by classmates and supporters, stands at a podium at a press conference to speak out against gun violence and claims that it can't be prevented

In the wake of the recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida, survivors from Stoneman Douglas High School and students across the country are planning a mass walk-out to call on legislators to prioritize their lives and safety when they’re passing laws to prevent gun violence. A lot of students are worried about what might happen to them if they participate in walk-outs and other forms of protest against being murdered in class by people carrying semiautomatic weapons that have no purpose other than to kill as many people as possible as quickly as possible. And it’s a valid concern.

Quick Hit: Florida legislates thoughts about prayers

Sheryl Acquarola, 16, a junior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, is overcome while watching the Florida state legislature decline to debate laws about assault rifles

After declining debate on assault rifles after last week’s school shooting in Parkland, Florida — but supporting a bill to protect kids from the life-threatening evils of porn — Florida lawmakers have decided to do something even more useless: require every public school in Florida to display the state motto, “In God We Trust,” in a “conspicuous place.”

Yeah, that’ll learn those mass shooters. Put ’em right in their place.

Congratulations on your all-male panel, BYU

A crop from a poster for BYU's "Women in Math" panel, featuring four male speakers and no women

I have gleefully been introduced to Congrats, you have an all-male panel!, a blog dedicated to recognizing panels, seminars, and events that bravely manage to ignore the existence of women as academics and experts. It came to my attention because of today’s panel at Brigham Young University about “Women in Math” that happens to exclude a single one of those. (But there will be treats! So that’s cool.)