“An excellent question”

That’s not how I’d qualify “How do we beat the bitch?,” but to each their own.

Most interesting to me is the roaring laughter in the room after the question is asked (for those who can’t see the video: McCain is fielding questions, and one woman asks, “How do we beat the bitch?” Everyone laughs, and some guy shouts out, “I thought you were talking about my ex-wife!”). Republicans insist that they aren’t a party reliant on sexism and racism. They lie.


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14 comments for ““An excellent question”

  1. November 14, 2007 at 1:44 pm

    Naturally, they use a woman to call the other woman a bitch so they can say “They must be bitches because women call each other bitch.”

  2. Betty Boondoggle
    November 14, 2007 at 2:08 pm

    they use a woman to call the other woman a bitch so they can say “They must be bitches because women call each other bitch.”

    Got to maintain plausble denability against charges of misogyny.

  3. November 14, 2007 at 2:19 pm

    Let’s not forget that this isn’t the first time the Republicans have let such commentary come forth from their supportors. When we last fielded a woman in the presidential race–Geraldine Ferraro in the position of vice-president–you’ll recall that we had Barbara Bush saying, “I can’t say it but it rhymes with rich.”

    http://www.bartleby.com/63/95/595.html

  4. Manju
    November 14, 2007 at 2:32 pm

    Democrats insist that they aren’t a party reliant on sexism and racism.

    They lie.

  5. November 14, 2007 at 4:23 pm

    Democrats insist that they aren’t a party reliant on sexism and racism.

    They lie.

    Private citizen/artist with no affiliation to the Democratic party calling Condi Rice a bitch /= GOP shill calling Clinton a bitch at a McCain campaign event, and a decades-long history of GOP candidates playing to voters’ racial fears and bigotries.

  6. November 14, 2007 at 5:50 pm

    unbelievable. just un fucking believable.

    as long as it’s funny, right?

    keep rocking, jill!

  7. November 15, 2007 at 9:33 am

    The thing is, it wasn’t even funny. Or is the single word “bitch” all it takes to elicit peals of laughter from right-wingers these days?

    On a related note, how many people in that crowd do you suppose have bitterly decried the use of the word “bitch” in hip-hop music as being profane and classless? I’m putting the over-under at 7.5.

  8. Mhorag
    November 15, 2007 at 1:13 pm

    Ah, if only I had any skill whatsoever in doing “mash-ups” (is that the term for putting together various video bits with musical backgrounds?), I have the perfect one, courtesy of Mr. McCain.

    Take many clips of Hillary Clinton and set them to Meredith Brooks’ “Bitch”.

    “I’m a bitch, I’m a lover, I’m a child, I’m a mother
    I’m a sinner, I’m a saint, I do not feel ashamed
    I’m your hell, I’m your dream, I’m nothin’ in between
    You know you wouldn’t want it any other way”

    Hell, if I saw an a political ad with this song as the theme, I’d vote for her regardless of other reasons (which is stupid, I know, but still …) Play to your strengths, I say!

    Not to mention it would play off McCain and Company’s misogyny in a pretty positive way, basically saying, “Bitch? You say that like it’s a bad thing … ”

    (evil laughter)

  9. False Flag Operative
    November 17, 2007 at 12:51 pm

    Private citizen/artist with no affiliation to the Democratic party calling Condi Rice a bitch /= GOP shill calling Clinton a bitch at a McCain campaign event, and a decades-long history of GOP candidates playing to voters’ racial fears and bigotries.

    Perhaps Manju gave the wrong example. Let me give it a shot.
    Woodrow Wilson, the Democrat president between 1913-1921, was definitely a racist and anti-feminist. He played the pro-kkk movie, Birth of a Nation at the White House and favored segregation. Some “progressive”. link

    I don’t buy into partisan propaganda, but there are bigots on both sides of the aisle. I vote for whoever is the best or least worst candidate based on their stances on issues, not by their party name.

  10. zuzu
    November 17, 2007 at 1:16 pm

    FFO, if you have to reach all the way back to 1913 for an example, that’s pretty damn sad.

  11. False Flag Operative
    November 17, 2007 at 2:56 pm

    FFO, if you have to reach all the way back to 1913 for an example, that’s pretty damn sad.

    I am fully aware of the Southern Strategy during Nixon’s run for the GOP ticket during the early 1970s. Just because someone has a “D” or “R” in front of their name doesn’t mean they aren’t accountable. Wilson endorsed segregation by firing African-Americans from his cabinet. He also threw anti-war critics in jail during WW1 when Congress passed the Espionage Act and Sedition. He shouldn’t get a pass because he was a “progressive” Democrat.

  12. zuzu
    November 17, 2007 at 4:30 pm

    Again, if you have to search back nearly a hundred years to someone who’s long dead for an example of “Democrats are just as racist as Republicans!” then you’re really stretching. Yeah, Wilson was racist. We get that. So were most candidates back then. It’s more than a bit disingenuous to hold him up as an example of what the current iteration of the party stands for. Because, remember, racist white Southerners deserted the Democrats in droves after the passage of the Civil Rights Act. And that’s part of the glue that continues to hold the Republican party together today.

    I mean, look at Trent Lott. Look at the campaign that was run against Harold Ford in Tennessee, or the whisper campaign against John McCain in South Carolina in 2000. Look at what the Bush Administration has done to the enforcement of civil rights laws in the Justice Department. Look at the response to Katrina. Do you have anything more recent on the D side to compare?

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