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Jill has been blogging for Feministe since 2005.
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61 Responses

  1. Cara
    Cara December 19, 2008 at 4:47 pm |

    The glaring, overt racism here is just vomit-inducing. Like Renee said, clearly the cops looked at her and said “12-year-old black girl? MUST be a prostitute!”

    I’m glad that so many people are posting on this (you beat me to it, yet again :P). And I agree absolutely that the fact idea that this would be acceptable behavior if the girl was a prostitute is something that needs to be called out and has been largely overlooked.

  2. Maritzia
    Maritzia December 19, 2008 at 5:07 pm |

    Yeah, I was just about to post the same thing Cara said. Coming from Houston, my first impulse is that she wasn’t assaulted because she was wearing shorts but because she was black and wearing shorts.

  3. Emily
    Emily December 19, 2008 at 5:19 pm |

    It’s also extremely common for police to charge people who they beat up with assaulting an officer, disorderly conduct, etc., specifically in order to cover their asses. It’s just absolutely ridiculous and one of the most heinous kinds of abuse of power. They need to justify what they did, to protect themselves from civil suit (not like they would ever actually be criminally prosecuted) so they charge her with a crime. Despicable.

  4. Emily
    Emily December 19, 2008 at 5:22 pm |

    And I have to add, I was kind of mildly surprised it happened to a white girl (or so I thought), since the description of Dymond as African-American came after the description of the alleged prostitutes as white, I had assumed, until getting to the later part of the article, that the 12 year old actually matched the racial description of the supposed prostitutes.

    And whoever is prosecuting the 12 year old should be fired.

  5. Kathleen
    Kathleen December 19, 2008 at 5:45 pm |

    Oh my god. This story is horrible on so many levels, and I’m appalled that a case against the poor girl and her family is even going to court in the first place. These men attacked a minor. It doesn’t sound like they ever identified themselves as police officers (and even if they had, she would’ve had every right to defend herself and try to get away considering they were trying to hurt her), and the fact that they and the city both seem to feel that it’s okay to hold a little girl responsible for her own attack is criminal and abhorrent. Those men should be fired, and the police chief should be held accountable.

    My heart hurts for Dymond and her family, and for the actual sex workers who have to deal with this all the time and suffer in silence for it.

  6. AnnaBella
    AnnaBella December 19, 2008 at 5:47 pm |

    Just saw this on Feministing as well. I’m glad it’s getting publicity. The racist narrative is pretty effing obvious, so hopefully something further an than an acquittal comes of this, like a systemic review of that police force. Ugh.

  7. shah8
    shah8 December 19, 2008 at 6:31 pm |

    /me shrugs…

    Read the Nation’s piece on the shooting of black people by a white militia. It’s a pretty similar situation. Post-hurricane, many things don’t work, many people are out of work, and plenty of people with lots of guns who see an opportunity to do a bit of ethnic cleansing on the sly. Of course, this event mentioned here happened waaaay before Hurricane Ike in 2006. However, it’s probably not really *that* different. A black person in an area that should be white, probably. Not drug dealer, not prostitute…

    People do this crap because they assume that individuals like the little girl here has no right to justice–like that Iranian woman. In the end, those police officers weren’t fired, and even in the iffy prospect of financial compensation, it will come from the taxpayers, and not the people who did it.

    Lastly, red flags are popping up all over the place. Given what I have read of this story, and it’s not enough to any kind of firm conclusion, it seems like the policemen’s story is only a tissue of lies. Nobody is going to mistake some 10 or 12 year old kid for a drug dealer, nor is anyone going to mistake her for a sex worker in a backyard–with no customers and no pimp. Furthermore, why the hell would they follow up and arrest the child at school three weeks later if not an attempt to coerce her silence?

    This was a straight up kidnapping atempt. That makes me seriously uncomfortable as to why undercover police would be trying to kidnap a kid–the best explanation of which would be to put pressure on a local drug dealer. The other reasons leads to some pretty dark corner.

  8. Claire
    Claire December 19, 2008 at 6:56 pm |

    What’s really upsetting is that a basketball game apparently can get people to riot, but shit like this goes down and the local police department remains un-burned.

  9. mimikey
    mimikey December 19, 2008 at 7:04 pm |

    Wow this is so horrible….I am speechless to what the world has become.

  10. SarahMC
    SarahMC December 19, 2008 at 7:12 pm |

    I am sick over this. There’s got to be some way we can help her family. This is such a fucking outrage on so many levels; I don’t even know what to say.

  11. SunlessNick
    SunlessNick December 19, 2008 at 8:10 pm |

    One of them grabbed her saying, “You’re a prostitute. You’re coming with me.”

    One of the men covered her mouth. Two of the men beat her about the face and throat.

    That’s not an arrest, that’s a fucking kidnapping.

  12. Pockysmama
    Pockysmama December 19, 2008 at 8:45 pm |

    That’s Texas.

  13. SunlessNick
    SunlessNick December 19, 2008 at 9:23 pm |

    That makes me seriously uncomfortable as to why undercover police would be trying to kidnap a kid

    That occurred to me too.

    Along with. These three alleged prostitutes were soliciting – nothing violent or dangerous – what other non-violent, non-dangerous crime would be responded to in such a brutal fashion? The sexism and racism are plain, but that’s not the only prejudice in play here.

  14. William
    William December 19, 2008 at 10:14 pm |

    This story popped up on TheAgitator.com earlier in the week. The general consensus over there matches what some of the people here have mentioned: this wasn’t an arrest but a masked kidnapping. Not in some abstract sense of an unlawful or unjust arrest (which would be the same), but as in actual kidnapping. The basic important facts are that three cops who weren’t in uniform were in a windowless white van and attempted to pull a 12 year old girl off the street in the dead of night. They tried to silence her screams and attacked her while she struggled. They didn’t identify themselves as police to her or her father until AFTER enough noise had been made that they couldn’t reasonably bail. The police claimed, after the fact, that they were investigating a reported crime but the suspects didn’t even vaguely resemble the girl they attacked.

    If three men tried to pull a 12 year old girl into a van, put their hands over her mouth to stop her from screaming, and beat her and her father for struggling we’d all assume it was an attempted rape. Just because their day job is to beat on minorities and write speeding tickets doesn’t mean they get the benefit of the doubt.

  15. Josef Parker
    Josef Parker December 19, 2008 at 10:41 pm |

    http://www.differentavenues.org/comm_research.html

    Different Avenues is this awesome organization in D.C. that provides a lot of services for youth who are experiencing homelessness and engaging in sex work. They compiled an extensive report this past year on the policing of prostitution in D.C. It is startling the type of shit police do to sex workers in D.C. I think the report says 1 in 5 of interviewed have been coerced into sex with police officers.

  16. meme
    meme December 19, 2008 at 11:18 pm |

    I can understand the nightmares that she’s being beat, but raped? We’re not exaggerating at all…

  17. Bene
    Bene December 19, 2008 at 11:29 pm |

    I saw this in a very different place (with similar reactions) a few days ago. And all I can say is that you keep peeling the levels of fucked up here and get more, like an onion.

  18. Mark
    Mark December 19, 2008 at 11:37 pm |

    Good thing this was not my daughter, I would probably be on trial for murder. If someone grabs my daughter and she starts screaming, I assume she is in trouble and those grabbing her are going to be dead, cops or not.

    And this from a pastor! May God have mercy on their souls. And may He bless our nation despite people like these cops.

  19. Atlanticslamon
    Atlanticslamon December 19, 2008 at 11:44 pm |

    I’m speechless. This entire case is absolutely appalling.

  20. E.M. Russell
    E.M. Russell December 20, 2008 at 12:00 am |

    @meme: Paaaardon? “We” are not the ones who three cops tried to kidnap and ended up beating instead. It’s a -12- year old girl. What happens to little girls who get kidnapped? Are they held for ransom? Are they put in an orphanage a la Oliver Twist? NOPE. If you’re kidnapping a little girl there are only a few motives and one of them very definitely is rape.

  21. Daphne B.
    Daphne B. December 20, 2008 at 12:14 am |

    @E. M. Russell: Agreed …especially if, while you’re being attacked, the cops shout at you “You’re a prostitute!” That’s enough to make anyone think of rape.

  22. Lara
    Lara December 20, 2008 at 1:02 am |

    @Pockysmama There are many people in the state of Texas that are not racist, bigots, or kidnappers. To generalize an entire population for the outrageous acts of a select few horrible people is not warranted. It is my fervent hope that every public official that participated in this atrocity will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law and will have to provide restitution to the family to help with counseling for this child.

  23. Alas, a blog » Blog Archive » Dymond Milburn Was About Three Things

    [...] As Jill points out, the assault on Dymond Milburn is about the wretched treatment of prostitutes by our [...]

  24. phil
    phil December 20, 2008 at 2:03 am |

    WHERE does it say the cops are WHITE? WHERE is there an element of racism… when the race of the cops isn’t noted?

    Try READING the article next time, ffs.

    Want some common sense? If they don’t mention the bad guys race, they’re most likely not white. Ever notice that? But if the victim is non-white, they mention it as much as possible. Ever notice that?

    Wake up, SHEEP!

  25. lynx
    lynx December 20, 2008 at 2:28 am |

    let’s look at the facts here:

    3 cops assault, batter, and attempt to kidnap a little girl, attempt to justify it by claiming they thought she was a sex worker. and then they show up and try to kidnap her again at school and charge HER with “resisting arrest.”

    and they don’t get fired. or even disciplined.

    and the family has to pay legal fees to keep them from incarcerating the poor kid.

    this is the type of shit that happens in police states & authoritarian regimes. it doesn’t happen in free open democracies where the rights of individuals are respected. this is not “keeping the peace” or “protecting and serving”, it’s the type of shit paramilitary death squads funded by our government do to little brown girls all over the so-called “third world.” Except there ordinary people usually have enough sense to stand up and at least try to fight back.

    I think Claire hit the nail squarely on the head. the appropriate response to this isn’t to file a lawsuit in the same criminal justice system that employs and shelters the men responsible, the appropriate response is to burn down the police station with the fuckers locked inside.

  26. To Protect and Serve | Soundtrack for Insurrection

    [...] I couldn’t make this shit up if I tried.  Read the full story over at Feministing. [...]

  27. Radfem
    Radfem December 20, 2008 at 2:42 am |

    Terrible, but this happens too often.

    And I think that “undercover” officers can be some of the most unstable on the force and I believe definitely in some cases, they hide officers there that they can’t put in public in patrol. They’re high on the list of officers who do shootings on duty and really high in the DV list as well.

  28. Jill
    Jill December 20, 2008 at 3:22 am |

    The fact is, and always has been, that cops have way too much power and far too much protection is given them when they commit a crime. When are people going to say enough is enough. These are the people that are supposed to be protecting ua, and yet, they are as bad as the criminals. In fact, they are worse in many ways because they know the department will protect them if they do anything wrong, and they usually get away with it as a result.

    These men should be treated as criminals, not cops. I know there are some good cops out there, but they are few and far between.

  29. Sharon Cullars
    Sharon Cullars December 20, 2008 at 10:39 am |

    Phil, racism against blacks can be perpetrated by any color, including other blacks. If any of these cops are of color, or in particular Af-Am, most likely they have inculcated the racist belief unfortunately held by too many in law enforcement that people of color aren’t really worth a damn. It’s not the color of the perpetrator that raises the issue of racism, but the institutionalized diminishment of a group of people based on stereotypes, assumptions and just plain ole hatred.

  30. Sharon Cullars
    Sharon Cullars December 20, 2008 at 10:42 am |

    Further, the racism in this case comes from the obvious fact that a black child was picked on even though the original description was of three white older prostitutes. This would never happen in reverse.

  31. Sharon Cullars
    Sharon Cullars December 20, 2008 at 10:48 am |

    One more point: in a society where many white teenagers dress like a Britney or Miley and shorts are de riguer fashion, how is it that a young black child wearing shorts rises to the image of a prostitute? Do you think these cops would have stopped a white 12-year-old similarly dressed? If you do think this, you need to take a stroll outside your comfortable perimeter and observe the disparity in treatment of black children vs. white children. Like the 5-y-old black girl who threw a temper tantrum and was handcuffed by police and arrested. Or the little black boy on a motorized bike on the sidewalked who was arrested for some traffic violation. Or the prosecutor who years ago had to be censured during the rape trial of a 10-y-old black child b/c he told the jury black girls were so fast, it was impossible to rape them. Now do you really think these incidents happen to white children? I’m just curious.

  32. Radfem
    Radfem December 20, 2008 at 1:07 pm |

    Phil, racism against blacks can be perpetrated by any color, including other blacks. If any of these cops are of color, or in particular Af-Am, most likely they have inculcated the racist belief unfortunately held by too many in law enforcement that people of color aren’t really worth a damn. It’s not the color of the perpetrator that raises the issue of racism, but the institutionalized diminishment of a group of people based on stereotypes, assumptions and just plain ole hatred.

    Race of the officer by itself makes no difference nor may gender either. The power structure in LE agencies and the profession is still predominantly White and male. And that’s what the agency is run on. And most agencies, the percentages of officers of color and/or women are much lower than they are for the people in the cities that are policed.

    Officers of color for example might be as racist acting or more racist acting to prove themselves to the White officers they may call to back them up in a situation.

  33. phil
    phil December 20, 2008 at 1:20 pm |

    You people are self-ignorant. Even when it’s pointed out that you do not know the race of the offender, you try to recover with “well, their race doesn’t matter… it’s still racism! The girl was black!”

    And if she was white? Would you still have cried racism?

    I didn’t think so.

    Sorry, but that’s ignorant.
    And I’m damn tired of your ignorance.

    9 out of 10 hate crimes are black on white. Wake up.

  34. Cara
    Cara December 20, 2008 at 1:35 pm |

    Phil, you clearly don’t understand the meaning of “hate crime” nor do are you listening to what other commenters are saying to your post about institutionalized racism and that leads me to believe that you’re attempting to derail the thread. “Reverse racism!!!1!!11!1″ doesn’t fly around here. Thus, you are on moderation and Jill may decide what to do with you.

  35. William
    William December 20, 2008 at 1:35 pm |

    Phil, I think you’re missing the point here because you’ve got a bug lodged in your ass about something, but I’ll take another shot. The cops got a report of three white adult women possibly committing a victimless crimes. They responded by attempting to rape a 12 year old black girl, beating her when she resisted, and then charging her and her father with assault on a police officer. They did it because they thought they could get away with it and the fact that they aren’t swinging from the nearest stout branch surrounded by a fucking mob means they were right. Thats racism.

  36. sleepyhead
    sleepyhead December 20, 2008 at 3:11 pm |

    My God. I hope her family sues the police department for millions, and that everybody involved in this gets fired.

    I mean, strange men pop out of a car, call you a prostitute, and grab you? What’s any woman going to think? And, of course, a kid’s going to be scared out of her wits, and her parents too. I can’t beleive this actually got to court, instead of leading to the cops getting fired.

    And I agree with William. This does sound more like an attempted kidnapping than an actual attempted arrest, which is even more frightening.

    And yes, its hideously racist. That has nothing to do with the color of the cops, but the fact that they thought they could get away with assaulting a black girl when the suspects were white women.

    Like I said: fire them all, and investigate them. If William is right, this might not be the first time this has happened. (Or, it might not be the first time they’ve assaulted someone, and likely isn’t, but I’m worried that if this was an attempted kidnapping, there might be a few succesful ones.)

  37. Bitter Scribe
    Bitter Scribe December 20, 2008 at 4:12 pm |

    Or the prosecutor who years ago had to be censured during the rape trial of a 10-y-old black child b/c he told the jury black girls were so fast, it was impossible to rape them.

    The PROSECUTOR? WTF??!?

    I could understand (while still being repelled by) a defense attorney saying something like that. But what in the name of dog would motivate a prosecutor to utter such nonsense?

  38. Sharon Cullars
    Sharon Cullars December 20, 2008 at 4:40 pm |

    Bitter Scribe, I misspoke. It was the defense atty.

  39. Brittany May
    Brittany May December 20, 2008 at 5:31 pm |

    I agree. Those cops, well, they certainly don’t deserve their Jobs. It seems that cops are bad all over. If you thought that was bad, you should see this news video regarding something that recently happened in my area.

    http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/note.php?note_id=108007315220&id=1298760469&index=5

    The young man who died in this horrible incident last year was my childhood best friend, and someone loved by all at our school. It seems that cops have no heart, anywhere you go.

  40. Betsy
    Betsy December 20, 2008 at 11:27 pm |

    Here’s the email I wrote to the above address:

    Sir:

    I am a Galveston native; I grew up off Stuart Rd. and graduated from Ball High
    in 1998. I was horrified and ashamed of my city to read of the reported
    conduct of police officers toward 12-year-old Dymond Milburn. It is wrong in
    so many ways I can’t begin to list them all. But what boggled my mind the most
    is that a 12-year-old girl, grabbed by three men in street clothes in a van
    outside her home, is being CHARGED with a crime for fighting back.

    Do you understand the message that sends? The message that sends to little
    girls is that they shouldn’t scream and try to get away when someone tries to
    kidnap and rape them as long as that person asserts (without evidence) that he
    is a police officer.

    So much else is wrong – that she was charged without any evidence that she was
    engaging in prostitution, especially since she did not even fit the description
    of the suspects involved; that the response when a little girl is suspected of
    engaging in prostitution is to arrest her, rather than get her to help and
    safety; that the officers were allegedly violent in apprehending someone who
    could not possibly have represented a threat to them… the list goes on and
    on. It is entirely evident that the only reason she was attacked this way is
    that she had the misfortune to go out of her house wearing clothing that the
    officers deemed inappropriate.

    The officers involved should be disciplined and the entire department clearly
    needs retraining in the appropriate use of force. I am not confident either of
    these things will happen. But at the very least the charges against Dymond and
    her father should be dropped. The nerve of charging a little girl and her
    father for resisting men who appeared to be trying to kidnap her is outrageous
    and disgusting.

  41. douglafem
    douglafem December 21, 2008 at 2:25 am |

    i second the disgust expressed at this blatant abuse of power.

    @ sharon cullers (or anyone else who can help me out),
    i’ve googled for the past 10 minutes, trying to find more information about that prosecuter’s claim about the 10-year-old rape survivor and black female sexuality, and i haven’t found anything. (i’m not familiar with the case and have no viable search terms, other than what you shared about it.) would you be able to provide a link?

  42. Sharon Cullars
    Sharon Cullars December 21, 2008 at 9:37 am |

    Dougla Fem, I tried to find the link and can’t locate it. I read about this a couple of years ago b/c the attorney in the case was censored for actually advancing this argument in court. This was around the time of the Duke case and at the time I was posting on the disparity of treatment of black women in rape cases. But what stood out was the age of the victim and that the case happened in the South. I will try to find that link again.

  43. SunlessNick
    SunlessNick December 21, 2008 at 11:27 am |

    And if she was white? Would you still have cried racism?

    I didn’t think so.

    And if pigs had wings, we’d probably use a different metaphor for things that’d never happen. What’s your point?

  44. dragonlynn
    dragonlynn December 21, 2008 at 1:12 pm |

    Now people wonder why we need our weapons. TOO KEEP US SAFE THAT”S WHY

  45. Miss Nomered
    Miss Nomered December 21, 2008 at 9:16 pm |

    Holy crap.

    Sigh…you know what’s missing in a lot of the discussion of this story?

    Even if they had been at the right house and arrested a sex worker, it’s still a hundred kinds of WRONG.

    Since when is violence against sex workers OK?

  46. Miss Nomered
    Miss Nomered December 21, 2008 at 9:18 pm |

    On edit: I’m glad the OP actually covered the violence against sex workers angle.

  47. Lyonside
    Lyonside December 21, 2008 at 10:36 pm |

    Absolutely appalling. I hope that IA is all over these… men… and gets a whole range of complaints that blows the “case” against the family out of the water.

    >9 out of 10…

    At this point, I knew for certain that Phil is a troll because s/he’s repeating a false “stat” popular on white supremecist boards.

  48. William
    William December 22, 2008 at 10:46 am |

    Absolutely appalling. I hope that IA is all over these… men… and gets a whole range of complaints that blows the “case” against the family out of the water.

    IA? Keep hoping. The likelihood that this family, or any family, will find justice is virtually nil. IA in most jurisdictions is a joke and even if by some miracle they do their job someone higher up the the chain of command or better positioned politically tends to step in and protect cops. Should the case manage to go to trial theres a good chance the police won’t be convicted of shit. Remember Rodney King all those years back? A bunch of cops videotaped beating a handcuffed black man were acquitted. People didn’t riot because it was an appalling incident, but because the community had dealt with abuse for generations and had now been publicly told that the police could do whatever they wanted. This case may be disgusting, but it isn’t unusual, atypical, or an exception. This is the way police all over the country conduct themselves every single day.

    I know that some here have strong feelings against violence, but I hope that if (when) the police in this case get a walk while the family gets a conviction that the fine people of Galveston take advantage of Texas’ status as a class three state.

  49. MaryC
    MaryC December 22, 2008 at 11:06 am |

    Phil, imagine if the little girl had been blonde and white. Think JonBenet Ramsey or Elizabeth Smart. Do you really think those officers would still have JOBS, let alone be prosecuting their victim?

    My heart absolutely breaks for this innocent little girl. You’re not supposed to experience this kind of thing ever, let alone at the age of 12.

  50. Tom Foolery
    Tom Foolery December 22, 2008 at 1:29 pm |

    Good to see this story is getting some coverage on progressive sites; the militarization of our law enforcement services is one of the biggest civil liberties crises we’re facing today.

    But regarding the discussion of racism:

    Phil, imagine if the little girl had been blonde and white. Think JonBenet Ramsey or Elizabeth Smart. Do you really think those officers would still have JOBS, let alone be prosecuting their victim?

    Here’s a video of the white, suburban, former mayor of a town in Maryland: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygTDx2165Jc, talking about his experience with being the target of a no-knock police raid, wherein he and his family were cuffed for hours and watched their pets killed right in front of them. Not quite as bad as what this little girl had to deal with, but nevertheless, the depths to which our police service has sunk is a problem that effects everyone, regardless of their race or socioeconomic status.

  51. Jackye Stephens
    Jackye Stephens December 22, 2008 at 5:20 pm |

    From the Chief himself:

    This incident occurred in mid-2006. I came to the Galveston Police Department in July of 2008, about two years later. The case is pending and I can’t comment on pending litigation, as much as I’d like to do so. The case also involves a juvenile offender and the law prohibits me prohibited from commenting about that. The case is reportedly close to a trial date and that may be a reason for the notoriety. Attorneys often try their cases in the court of public opinion in order to influence the outcome in a courtroom. I think that many will be surprised about the facts once the facts are actually reported in the mainstream media and not as reported in the alternative media.

    Charles Wiley
    Chief of Police

  52. Tom Foolery
    Tom Foolery December 22, 2008 at 6:18 pm |

    ^^^^ Pure ass-covering.

  53. Radfem
    Radfem December 22, 2008 at 7:46 pm |

    Absolutely appalling. I hope that IA is all over these… men… and gets a whole range of complaints that blows the “case” against the family out of the water.

    IA is almost never “all over” anything. It serves two purposes. To cover up the conduct of bad officers and to protect the city from civil liability and to punish any good officers who tell on the bad ones. And if you do deal with IA and the officers get pissed off and retaliate, you’re next to defenseless. So people should be very cautious if ever thinking about filing complaints with them or being involved in any of their investigations.

    That’s pretty much except for rare cases and Rodney King in L.A. actually was one of those rare cases. The IA investigation had nothing really much to do with the criminal investigation as they’re usually bifurcated or separate because of two separate legal standards for officers giving statements about what they did or witnessed for administrative and criminal investigations.

    The four officers were fired which is the best outcome out of that IA investigation but it only went forward b/c of public exposure. If you remember, George Holliday, the man who took the footage of the King beating tried to hand his tape to the LAPD first but they wouldn’t accept it, so he went to Warren Wilson, probably the only mainstream TV reporter who would accept it.

    The criminal case went south because of anemic prosecution, vital evidence being excluded including the officers’ prior disciplinary history in the LAPD and in one case, an outside LE agency and because the jury pool in Simi Valley is mostly White retired military and/or police. That trial was won by the officers after the change of venue was granted. My county was third on the change of venue list and the outcome would have been the same, an acquittal.

    From the Chief himself:

    This incident occurred in mid-2006. I came to the Galveston Police Department in July of 2008, about two years later. The case is pending and I can’t comment on pending litigation, as much as I’d like to do so. The case also involves a juvenile offender and the law prohibits me prohibited from commenting about that. The case is reportedly close to a trial date and that may be a reason for the notoriety. Attorneys often try their cases in the court of public opinion in order to influence the outcome in a courtroom. I think that many will be surprised about the facts once the facts are actually reported in the mainstream media and not as reported in the alternative media.

    Charles Wiley
    Chief of Police

    LOL, only because this is classic chief-speak. They’ll tell you first how law prohibits them from commenting on a case and then they’ll naturally comment on it anyway but in a way that hints that there’s this top-secret information which of course they never have to reveal which shows the “truth” of the case in another light. And if only you knew, you’d be so surprised at what that was and how skewed the media has turned it to make it look like the cops are at fault.

    Seriously, this just happened in my city over a different type of incident which was put in the public spotlight. But they must all read it out of the same manual or something.

  54. Comrade PhysioProf
    Comrade PhysioProf December 22, 2008 at 8:19 pm |

    And I think that “undercover” officers can be some of the most unstable on the force and I believe definitely in some cases, they hide officers there that they can’t put in public in patrol. They’re high on the list of officers who do shootings on duty and really high in the DV list as well.

    This makes a lot of sense. What is the “DV list”?

  55. Tom Foolery
    Tom Foolery December 22, 2008 at 8:31 pm |

    Just guessing here, but probably the Domestic Violence statistics.

  56. Radfem
    Radfem December 23, 2008 at 12:23 am |

    Yeah, police officers are involved in domestic violence against their partners or other family members at a disproportionately higher rate.

  57. William
    William December 23, 2008 at 10:30 am |

    Yeah, police officers are involved in domestic violence against their partners or other family members at a disproportionately higher rate.

    Not to mention alcoholism, DUI offenses, non-domestic violence incidents, suicide, and all manner of low level antisocial behavior (disregard for traffic laws, generally obnoxious behavior, etc). Its amazing how people who are drawn to jobs which give them power and authority respond when they are given a gun and told that the rules no longer apply to them.

  58. Mike Crichton
    Mike Crichton December 23, 2008 at 3:57 pm |

    I’m going to give the cops enough benefit of the doubt to believe that they really _did_ think the girl was a prostitute. But it’s pretty obvious that if they succeeded in this arrest, they were going to have a little “fun”. Wasn’t having a well-armed populace supposed to prevent this sort of governmental abuse of power? You’d think teh NRA would be all over something like this. Oh, wait…

  59. Rei
    Rei December 30, 2008 at 3:15 am |

    Wow, Americans have such a messed up country.

  60. Annie
    Annie January 3, 2009 at 3:50 am |

    REI: And from what perfect country are you speaking? Your assumption that America is so messed up is ignorant. Yes, there are problems here but we’re open enough that we let the bad things be known. For the most part, most Americans are decent, caring people who give of their time and money to help people all over the world. Perhaps you need to think before you speak next time.

  61. Bernarr
    Bernarr January 5, 2009 at 1:52 am |

    This won’t stop until:
    Police Officers are held accountable.
    We should require our legislatures to enact changes to the criminal code.
    Any Police Officer who wrongly accuses a citizen of any crime should have to do the maximum of jail time and personal fines for the crime itself.

    Accountability starts with doing the job right, not halfway and letting bad guys roam our streets in uniforms with badges.

    I have no room in my heart for crooked cops.

    Good luck to the Milburn family!!

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