Stupid Story of the Day

Christian dude upset that chefs recommend “kosher salt.” Decides to make “Christian salt” blessed by Episcopal priest. So pointless I don’t even know what to say.

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About Jill

Jill began blogging for Feministe in 2005. She has since written as a weekly columnist for the Guardian newspaper and in April 2014 she was appointed as senior political writer for Cosmopolitan magazine.
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33 Responses to Stupid Story of the Day

  1. La Lubu says:

    Wow. WOW. That level of stupid has to be physically painful. What’s this schmuck gonna do when he finds out that Jesus is actually Yeshua, and was Jewish?

  2. FashionablyEvil says:

    But kosher salt isn’t salt that’s been deemed kosher, it’s salt that’s used to kosher meat.

    Never let the truth get in the way of a good story, er, business idea, though.

  3. PeggyLuWho says:

    La Lubu, his reaction to the realization that Yeshua was the reincarnation of some buddha or other will be even more shocking.

    And just as unlikely that he’ll even allow himself to discover.

    Do you think this is more or less dumb than when the Christians tried to reinvent Yoga?

  4. Does this guy even know what “kosher” means? I’m baffled.

  5. SA says:

    It’s not stupid (from a money-making perspective). He’ll make a lot of money out of people who think that recommending Kosher salt is “politically correct racism.”

  6. Bagelsan says:

    I want some Christian salt with my Freedom fries, please!

    (Also kinda embarrassed that he got an Episcopalian on board with that; usually they seem pretty cool… :p)

  7. Talk about a goyishe kop!

  8. Ruchama says:

    So it looks like his Christian Salt isn’t even the same thing as kosher salt, so in recipes that call for kosher salt, he’ll still need to use that.

    I’m … just so puzzled by this. Has this man every cooked anything? Does he know the difference between kosher salt and salt that happens to be kosher (which is pretty much all salt)?

  9. Pingback: Alas, a blog » Blog Archive » Talk about a goyishe kop!

  10. Pingback: Talk about a goyishe kop! « It’s All Connected…

  11. La Lubu says:

    Do you think this is more or less dumb than when the Christians tried to reinvent Yoga?

    Or karate, for that matter. Hard to say. When the shit gets that dumb, it’s hard to accurately place on a linear scale. It’s kinda like, there’s dumb, and there’s really dumb, and there’s wind-chill effect dumb, but if you keep going down the scale, eventually you will reach absolute dumb, at which point all (potentially available) brain cells have ceased motion.

  12. Cecilia says:

    Wow, the level of ignorance, stupidity and bigotry is amazing! I’m sure that “Christian Salt” will sell very well, there is a huge potential market!

  13. Seth Gordon says:

    The next time I drink the blood of Christian babies, I’ll know what to season it with.

  14. Bitter Scribe says:

    I hope this guy never finds out why a lot of food labels include a little “K” or “U” in a circle. He’ll probably die of apoplexy.

    Or, if he survives, be restricted by his doctor to a no-salt diet.

  15. The Opoponax says:

    Do you think this is more or less dumb than when the Christians tried to reinvent Yoga?

    Way, way dumber.

    I mean, kosher salt is just called that, because it’s used to make meat kosher. It’s just a kind of salt. It’s like making a product called Sky Salt because the notion of Sea Salt just bugs you on principle. It has no meaning at all.

    But there are some Christians who (while I think this is totally dumb) have problems with the idea that yoga has strong ties to Hinduism and Buddhism, and want to further divorce the physical exercise that is hatha yoga from the slightly more spiritual practices that go hand in hand with it. There IS a reason a devout fundamentalist Christian might not want to do “traditional” yoga. There is NO reason a devout fundamentalist Christian should have a problem with using kosher salt, aside from general antisemitism and total ignorance.

  16. I can’t even come up with an articulate response to that. So much fail, so few words.

  17. M. says:

    My mind BOGGLES.

    I use Celtic sea salt for almost everything because it is super-tasty and my doctor recommended it–does that mean I’m prejudiced against non-Celtic countries that produce other kinds of salt (except it’s actually from France, like a lot of fancy salts)? Wow.

    I’m thinking this guy doesn’t know anything about cooking.

  18. Pingback: *Christian* salt!?! — Bligbi

  19. ACG says:

    Nobody tell this guy that sea salt is halal.

  20. Kristin says:

    That’s bizarre. Most Episcopalians are not fundamentalists.

  21. Ouyang Dan says:


    If people are stupid enough to fall for and buy this, that great. Go be dumb somewhere else w/ your dumb salt.

    Gah! I can’t even come up w/ anything intelligent to add.

  22. LOL. I’ll be amused the first time someone tries to use “Christian salt” in a recipe calling for kosher salt and ends up with way under- or over- salted food. Unless the salt being blessed is kosher salt, it’ll have a different density and that’ll fuck with baking.

  23. Ledasmom says:

    Is it made from real Christians?

  24. Sid says:

    In response to the extra virgin olive oil put out by all these nutty people, I’m gonna make extra slutty olive oil!

  25. Pingback: Christian Salt? SRSLY? « Notes from Evil Bender

  26. Ari Sahagun says:

    Another stupid story, this showed up on my google homepage news today.

    Unfortunately no one questioned the fact that there was a giant ass to preface the story of women becoming the majority of the US workforce…

  27. Pingback: Moue Magazine » Blog Archive » Food Network: A Zionist Conspiracy?

  28. J says:

    Nobody tell him it’s also vegetarian!

    Next up, beef salt, blessed by a chainsaw.

    Because if you don’t eat meat with it, the vegetarians win.

  29. Bitter Scribe: The “U” in a circle means they paid the Jew tax.

    19thandfolsom: Keep your Godless secular science out of his Christian kitchen.

    Boy, this really invalidates a whole bunch of comments I’ve left at Alas since I got home.

  30. Phenicks says:

    La Luba, we can all determine this guy was stupid without insulting the beliefs of Christians as a whole. He is but one person not a representation of all Christians. As diverse as this country is most people know better than to assume the culture or religion of anyone here regardless of what they look like. The chef’s mistake was in assuming the “CHristian dude” was Jewish and the “Christian dude’s” mistake was in his reaction, extremely immature. I always thought as a CHristian you simply blessed your own meals by praying before you eat, no need to call it anything other than what it is, food.

  31. MomTFH says:

    Two things: First, this story was worth it because of all of the incredibly funny comments on here.

    Second, Phenicks, do you really think you’re not a troll? Because I have seen you post on four threads recently, including this one, and it seems to me that you are missing the point and the tone of the main posts, the comments, and the site.

    I don’t see La Luba insulting Christians as a whole. You seem to want to come on here and argue a whole bunch and derail these threads.

  32. MomTFH says:

    Oh, and it wasn’t the “chef’s mistake…in assuming the “Christian dude” was Jewish”. If you haven’t read all of the comments ridiculing how stupid this guy is for not knowing this, let me explain what kosher salt is once more. Kosher salt is a style of salt. It refers to the size of the grain. Specific recipes would call for kosher salt instead of table salt because it behaves differently. ALL salt is acceptable to someone who follows a kosher diet.

    The original post and the article it links to clearly say the man was upset that television “chefs” (plural) recommend using kosher salt for recipes. Not one chef making a mistake by assuming he was Jewish.

    It would be like getting mad that chefs recommend confectioner’s sugar and saying – I am not a confectioner! I am a baker! And marketing regular granulated sugar as “baker’s sugar”, certified by bakers for bakers. But…with a ridiculous religious twist.

  33. Shorter Phenicks: lousy Jews, being different in public.

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