Troy Davis Decision Postponed by Supreme Court

Tentatively good news in the case of Troy Davis, the man on death row for the murder of a police officer despite his maintained innocence, no physical evidence tying him to the crime, and seven out of nine witnesses having recanted.  The US Supreme Court has put off their decision regarding whether or not to take up his case until they reconvene in September.  What that means is firstly that there can be no execution date set in the mean time, and secondly that they may be giving his case more careful consideration than they had previously.  It seems like both Amnesty International and the NAACP, two of Troy’s biggest champions, are hoping that the latter is true.

NAACP President Benjamin Jealous, however, realistically notes in an NPR opinion piece that you really ought to check out, that the last time the Supreme Court granted a motion similar to Troy Davis’ was in 1925.  That means that while it’s an outside possibility, and while it’s undoubtedly good news that an execution date will definitely not be set for at least a couple of months, other avenues have to continue being pursued.

Amnesty International is still urging you to contact Chatham County’s new DA Larry Chisolm, asking him to reopen Troy Davis’ case. I put out this same alert a while back, but if you didn’t at the time, it’s imperative that you do it now.

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4 Responses to Troy Davis Decision Postponed by Supreme Court

  1. debbie says:

    Hey Cara,

    Thanks for posting updates about this case. It’s truly an outrage that this man is still in jail, let alone on death row.

  2. Dudley Sharp says:

    Troy Davis: Both sides need to be told
    Dudley Sharp

    Anyone interested in justice will demand a fair, thorough look at both sides of this or any case. Here is the side that the pro Troy Davis faction is, intentionally, not presenting.

    (1) Davis v Georgia, Georgia Supreme Court, 3/17/08
    Full ruling

    ” . . . the majority finds that ‘most of the witnesses to the crime who have allegedly recanted have merely stated that they now do not feel able to identify the shooter.’ “One of the affidavits ‘might actually be read so as to confirm trial testimony that Davis was the shooter.’ ”

    The murder occurred in 1989.


    “After an exhaustive review of all available information regarding the Troy Davis case and after considering all possible reasons for granting clemency, the Board has determined that clemency is not warranted.”

    “The Board has now spent more than a year studying and considering this case. As a part of its proceedings, the Board gave Davis’ attorneys an opportunity to present every witness they desired to support their allegation that there is doubt as to Davis’ guilt. The Board heard each of these witnesses and questioned them closely. In addition, the Board has studied the voluminous trial transcript, the police investigation report and the initial statements of all witnesses. The Board has also had certain physical evidence retested and Davis interviewed.”

    (3) A detailed review of the extraordinary consideration that Davis was given for all of his claims, by Chatham County District Attorney Spencer Lawton

    Troy Davis’ claims are undermined, revealing the dishonesty of the Davis advocates . Look, particularly, at pages 4-7, which show the reasoned, thoughtful and generous reviews of Davis’ claims, as well a how despicable the one sided cynical pro Troy Davis effort is.

    (4) Officer Mark Allen MacPhail: The family of murdered Officer MacPhail fully believes that Troy Davis murdered their loved one and that the evidence is supportive of that opinion.

    Not simply an emotional and understandable plea for justice, but a detailed factual review of the case.

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