This is what white privilege looks like

This video is one of the clearest and most appalling demonstrations of white privilege that I have ever seen. And this is probably the shortest post I have ever written on any topic, because I can’t think what else to say.

Edit: I’m really sorry I linked without a transcript. By the time I realized, other people had already written descriptions of the video in comments. I won’t make that mistake again.

48 comments for “This is what white privilege looks like

  1. Marle
    March 1, 2011 at 11:19 am

    Hey, is it possible for someone to provide a brief summary of what the video showed for those of us who can’t watch videos? Thanks so much.

  2. March 1, 2011 at 11:29 am

    Oh my god, that is ridiculous! It makes my brain go kersplodey! I honestly wouldn’t have thought those tests would be so drastically different (which just shows you how white I am). For the record, I’m reasonably certain I would have kept walking with either one. I don’t like the idea of being smacked in the head with a pair of bolt cutters.

    @Marle: It’s one of those “let’s see what people do when a crime happens” news tests. They have a white teen try to steal a locked bike and most people just walk by. They have a similarly dressed black teen do the same thing and many people immediately confront him.

  3. Kristen J.'s Husband
    March 1, 2011 at 11:31 am

    It’s just ridiculous isn’t it? Last week Kristen and I were driving through Texas and I was pulled over for driving in the passing lane. Keep in mind I wasn’t speeding and I was actually passing the semis in the right lane. The officer asked me to get out of the car and stand next to his patrol vehicle. While I was standing there he asked Kristen whether she needed “assistance,” whether we were *actually* married, and where my last name was from. He then proceeded to question me, my ownership of the vehicle, our marriage, and my citizenship.

    Because when a white woman is in a car with a brown man, it seemed more likely to him that she was being kidnapped by a undocumented person than that they would be married and traveling together across Texas. Ridiculous. But this is why I still consider our marriage a radical act.

  4. March 1, 2011 at 11:40 am

    @ Marle – it’s an expose news show where first passers-by are exposed to a young white male actor behaving suspiciously with a bike in a park, and while many appear concerned that he might be stealing it, generally most of them don’t get involved or only briefly confront him. When the young white actor is replaced by a young black male actor in similar clothing performing similar suspicious behaviours, the passers-by are much more confrontational, crowds form, yelling ensues, and some people start calling 911 immediately.

    There’s another video out there from the same show that I found even more compelling. It’s part of their series on how people will react to someone behaving in an overtly racist manner, in this case a store clerk in a high-end fashion boutique blatantly disregarding a well-dressed black woman trying to get assistance in the store (both are actors). One white female customer burst into tears as soon as she realized that something overtly racist was occurring, as she later explained not so much because it was racist but because it was happening right there in front of her. When she began crying, the black actor playing the object of the racist dismissal hugged and comforted her.

    That is white privilege.

  5. speedbudget
    March 1, 2011 at 11:41 am

    The video really upset me on a visceral level. I didn’t think it would affect me that much, but seeing racism in action was just…I can’t even. And if you called any of these people on the fact that their reaction was over the top (I mean, come on. It’s a bike.) when the black kid was involved, they would get all indignant.

  6. Courtney
    March 1, 2011 at 11:48 am

    Hey Marle,

    Two scenarios are presented, both of which feature male identified actors of about the same age (late teens-early twenties, I think), wearing similar clothing, both using progressively more sophisticated tools to try and remove a chain lock from a bike in a public park. The first actor is white and the second is black. It looks like a suburban setting in the US (to me, someone else might have a better idea as to location.)

    The first actor (the white person) works on it for an hour. A lot of people stop and stare, and some question him. Even though he acknowledges it is not his bike, no one attempts to contact any kind of authority until the very end of that time, and after stopping and/or questioning the actor, the people move along.

    In the second scenario, the black actor is questioned almost immediately–the report implies it is within seconds. A crowd forms around him. There is a lot of shouting about how it’s not his to take. At least two people in the crowd get on their cell phones to call 911/the police department.

    When questioned afterwards, the people involved say that the race of the second actor had nothing to do with their reactions.

    The black actor even looks shocked at how quickly and viciously things happened.

    There is additional reaction stuff, but frankly, the scenario speaks for itself.

  7. March 1, 2011 at 11:51 am

    Found it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFO1b9I-u5Q

    My description above isn’t fully accurate in terms of the white woman’s reaction. Her exact words were, “I’m so glad this wasn’t real!” after freaking out when the store clerk tried to engage her with racist comments about the black shopper. I am interpreting that she was more upset about being confronted by the racism directly than the racism itself in the abstract.

  8. FashionablyEvil
    March 1, 2011 at 11:52 am

    Marle, it’s an experiment showing two young men (one white, one black) attempting to “steal” a bike. (The whole thing is a set up for a TV show). Only one couple stops the white man, despite his use of increasingly sophisticated tools like an electric saw, while crowds of people stop the black man, attempt to stop him, take his stuff, call the police, etc.

  9. Miku
    March 1, 2011 at 11:57 am

    I know people have already summarised, but it took me a while to write this so I’m going to post it anyway!: There is a white actor on camera trying to steal a bike in the middle of the afternoon with various tools, while passersby look onward, not suspicious of anything. Even when the actor asks a man “You wouldn’t happen to know whose bike this is, would you?” while chewing away at the lock, the man just says “No.” The narrator says over 100 people pass by, but only two (a couple) try to stop the man. A group of black women are asked why they kept walking, giving the man the benefit of the doubt. She says in response, “I remember thinking young, white men don’t usually carry burglar tools.”

    They switch the white actor out for a black actor and the first person stops to question him about what he’s doing. A crowd gathers quickly, all questioning him or staring at him. Some people call 911 right away while others take pictures while saying “Gotcha! I gotcha!” They do the experiment over, and, again, within minutes an older, white male approaches and asks, “Is this your bike?” The actor responds honestly and the man begins to take his tools, saying that “You can’t just take something from somebody. Okay, well I’ll just take your tools, then,” and he grabs the bags and they begin yelling.

    After this, it’s revealed as an experiment and everyone who accosted the black actor says they would do the same if he was white. At the very end, the black actor is asked if he had lost his key. Answered yes, the older, white male decides to help him get the bike off the post.

    ————–
    It makes me feel all kinds of shitty, but I can’t say that it shocked me. I’m sure the same thing would happen in Canada or the UK or other similar places.

  10. March 1, 2011 at 12:02 pm

    The ones about sexism are worth watching too, assuming you can stomach it. There was one video about implied domestic violence in a restraunt, with a white couple and also with a black couple and I think each couple did it twice too, once with the woman wearing “revealing” clothes.
    The other video I remember was about a guy slipping something into his date’s drink (both actors obviously, along with the bartender), again with the woman dressing conseratively versus “provocatively”. I don’t remember if they had a black couple and a white couple for that one.

    The results were pretty much what you would expect in both sets of videos: disheartening.

    There were 2 reactions to the spiked drink video that stuck with me though. In one, 2 guys leave the bar after seeing the guy actor slip something into his date’s drink but not before talking about how the guy was “cheating” and taking the easy way out… and where could they find what he was using. I think they even asked the guy if he could give them some of whatever drug it was.

    The other reaction was a wife who got up in the guy’s face while even her husband was trying to pull her back and get her to leave the bar. She refused and was in the process of calling the cops when the host and video cameras came out. If I remember right she alluded that she had been in that situation before and didn’t want to see someone else go through it too. Then the female actor started crying and it turned out that she was acting out what had actually happened to her before and she was so greatful for the woman trying to help her even though the situation turned out to be fake.

  11. March 1, 2011 at 12:04 pm

    ugh, ignore my rage typos please.

  12. Marle
    March 1, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    Thanks everyone!

    I’m glad they did this experiment to show people. A lot of times it’s hard to prove privilege, because usually there’s enough variables between things that happen randomly that it’s impossible to say with 100% certainty that race was the only factor. But if enough experiements are done like this (and privilege experiements done in the past) and we keep showing them to people, then more and more people will realize what’s going on.

  13. Roxie
    March 1, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    This one upsets me more.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSkeIdFdifY

    While conducting a social experiment about two groups of boys vandalizing a car that isn’t theirs two calls are made to the police department about about a completely different situation. The caller heard in the video says,

    “There’s a couple guys in the car laying down. Like, they look like possibly they’re getting ready to, uh, rob somebody.”

    The people in the car where relatives of one of the black actors. They’d been invited to come along that day and were sleeping in the car. SLEEPING WHILE BLACK

  14. Sheelzebub
    March 1, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    Can’t watch this–I’m at work–but I can say that I’m not at all surprised, considering the shit that comes out of other White people’s mouths when they talk to me. When I was in college, I got yelled at by my manager in my retail job for not watching Black people like a hawk. Because “they all steal.” For fuck’s sake.

    And I have black friends who are routinely pulled over when driving and followed by security when shopping (and if they are female and walking, hassled by curb-crawlers as well as cops).

    It is fucking ridiculous.

  15. March 1, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    Here’s the website if anyone wants to see what other types of videos this program has done.

  16. March 1, 2011 at 12:48 pm

    My question is, did the couple who confronted the white kid do so because of their own prejudices? Maybe age, the backwards hat, the longer hair?

    Is it weird that when that guy was yelling at Matlock and taking his stuff I got really pissed off? I just wanted to smack him.

  17. R.Dave
    March 1, 2011 at 12:53 pm

    I have to call a bit of b.s. on the linked video.

    When the white actor is asked whether it’s his bike, he says, “No not exactly,” and “Uh, I guess…technically…no.” When asked what happened, he says, “Nothing, I just can’t get through this lock. Hey, I know this is weird, but you wouldn’t happen to know whose bike this is?” Those are disarming comments and that last line in particular suggests he has a legitimate reason for his actions.

    When the black actor is first asked whether it’s his bike, he simply says, “Naw.” When he’s asked again by another person, he says, “Not technically, but it’s gonna be.” Those are the opposite of disarming comments, and once the first couple people have their suspicions raised, the crowd forms.

    Also, their clothes may be “similar” but they’re not the same. The long, baggy shirt and skewed, flat-lid hat the black actor wears are obviously totally common style choices for young black men, but the signaling of that look is ambiguous because of its origins in hip-hop and rap (and the deliberate “gangsta” image of those genres). There’s no equivalent ambiguity about the white actor’s clothes.

    I don’t for a second doubt that there’s a huge amount of white privilege in situations like this one, but this video just does a lousy job of controlling for other factors. They should have had identical clothing and scripted lines. The variations undermine the validity of the “study”.

  18. March 1, 2011 at 1:08 pm

    ugh, just realized that with my first comment i coopted a discussion about racism to talk about sexism instead, and not even in a tangential way. My sincere apologies everyone.
    /white privilege derail

  19. Q Grrl
    March 1, 2011 at 1:22 pm

    R.Dave: I think part of the point is that white privilege often gets to dictate what is “legitimate” clothing and what isn’t. We can read it as code for several different things: youth, affiliation, status, or perhaps even comfort. The deeper question should be: why do so many people associate it with delinquency? Even if it is “gangsta”, aren’t most people who rock the gangsta look successful, powerful, and not criminal?

  20. Q Grrl
    March 1, 2011 at 1:59 pm

    LOL R.Dave. Just saw you trolling on Shakesville. You should probably change your name.

    Also, I finally got a chance to watch this video and the two men used and they are dressed *exactly* the same. The hats and shirts and shoes change color, but they have on identical jeans/t-shirt ensembles. Perhaps you need to drop some privilege? LOL. again.

  21. R.Dave
    March 1, 2011 at 2:09 pm

    Q Grrl: It’s true that the privileged group dictates what the “default” style is, but the specific baggage associated with other styles are, I think, largely a result of the character of the groups that initially adopt and popularize those styles. For instance, why do people associate muscular white guys sporting shaved heads, goatees, tattoos, cargo pants tucked into black combat boots, etc. with neo-nazis? Because that look was adopted and promulgated by neo-nazis. So now, anyone who dresses that way is automatically associated with neo-nazis. Similarly, people associate white teenagers with long hair, baggy clothes, piercings, a certain vacant expression (semi-kidding on that one!), etc. with skaters, because that’s the look skaters chose and popularized for themselves.

    In short, the problem here isn’t that the privileged white establishment has wrongfully associated criminality with mainstream black-American styles; the problem is that mainstream black-Americans have adopted styles initially popularized by criminals and celebrities who glorified criminality. As a result, the signaling effect of the clothes worn by many perfectly innocent black men is now ambiguous, which in turn contributes to the kind of misjudgments shown in the video.

  22. R.Dave
    March 1, 2011 at 2:16 pm

    Q Grrl: I wasn’t trolling on Shakesville. I disagreed with a point in Melissa’s post, had a couple of perfectly civil exchanges on the issue with other commenters, and immediately dropped the point when Melissa called an end to the discussion. Nothing about that is trolling.

    As for the clothing being the same between the two actors in this video, I think you’re being overly general if you think “jeans, t-shirt, hat” is sufficiently descriptive. There are worlds of variation possible using those three categories of clothing, and these two actors have different styles of each item.

  23. abby jean
    March 1, 2011 at 2:21 pm

    there are also plenty of scientific studies with all the relevant controls, etc, that demonstrate the same point about how people are much more likely to perceive criminality in the behavior of people of color than the behavior of whites. this video is just an illustration for people who don’t want to read journal articles in social science journals to get this point.

  24. R.Dave
    March 1, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    Aye, like I said, I don’t doubt that there’s white privilege (i.e. racial bias against black people) in this kind of situation. I just found the video somewhat uncompelling, and I find the idea of signaling interesting.

  25. Q Grrl
    March 1, 2011 at 2:47 pm

    Okay, maybe you’re just at the beginning of your learning curve. Having you pop up in two threads on two different sites with similar arguments was… odd.

    As for the video: watch again. There is no significant difference between the clothes. Skin color and body type (bulky vs slender) differ, but not the clothes.

  26. March 1, 2011 at 2:54 pm

    In short, the problem here isn’t that the privileged white establishment has wrongfully associated criminality with mainstream black-American styles; the problem is that mainstream black-Americans have adopted styles initially popularized by criminals and celebrities who glorified criminality.

    Just so you know, saying Black people dress like criminals and are understandably mistaken for such is racist.

  27. Marle
    March 1, 2011 at 2:57 pm

    R. Dave, have you ever noticed that when people complain about “gangsta”, they are using typical clothing and language of urban black youth to complain about them without wanting to sound directly racist?

    I’m sure that black people who dress and act like white people typically do might face less racism (not none). But that really doesn’t help anti-racism at all. And really, if you grew up white in a white neighborhood (as the white actor probably did) so you never turn your hat or talk in a way that others might judge you for being “gangsta”, then isn’t that white privilege as well?

  28. Q Grrl
    March 1, 2011 at 3:02 pm

    In short, the problem here isn’t that the privileged white establishment has wrongfully associated criminality with mainstream black-American styles; the problem is that mainstream black-Americans have adopted styles initially popularized by criminals and celebrities who glorified criminality.

    And you levy this same criticism against young white men who wear suits and dress shoes, right? Because, as far as crime goes, the biggest criminals in the US (and those that support those criminals) all dress exactly.the.same.way. In fact, an entire category of crime is not called “gangsta” — it’s called “white collar.”

    Go figure.

  29. R.Dave
    March 1, 2011 at 3:12 pm

    Angel H. wrote: Just so you know, saying Black people dress like criminals and are understandably mistaken for such is racist.

    Why? Honest question. What’s racist about saying: “Group X originated and popularized this style, so when members of Group Y emulates that style, they may be mistaken for members of Group X.”

  30. March 1, 2011 at 3:26 pm

    R.Dave:

    You really don’t see anything wrong with saying Black people dress like criminals?

  31. Q Grrl
    March 1, 2011 at 3:26 pm

    R.Dave: for starters, that’s not what you originally said, is it?

  32. R.Dave
    March 1, 2011 at 3:30 pm

    Marle wrote: R. Dave, have you ever noticed that when people complain about “gangsta”, they are using typical clothing and language of urban black youth to complain about them without wanting to sound directly racist?

    In some cases, yes. In many cases, no. Just because a critique can be misappropriated by those with an axe to grind doesn’t make the critique false. However, that’s an interesting demonstration of my own point turned against me. Racists often say X, therefore, you associate statements like X with racists and suspect the motives of anyone who makes those statements. Same deal for mode of dress, is all I’m getting at.

    Marle wrote: And really, if you grew up white in a white neighborhood (as the white actor probably did) so you never turn your hat or talk in a way that others might judge you for being “gangsta”, then isn’t that white privilege as well?

    It is, but the privilege in that case is in the differing childhood circumstances, not the bike-stealing experiment. In other words, would you still call it white privilege if a black person grows up middle class and thus learns a certain mode of speech and dress that isn’t considered gangsta? Also, isn’t that argument uncomfortably close to claims of “acting white” as opposed to just not emulating a pop-culture that glorifies crime?

  33. Q Grrl
    March 1, 2011 at 3:58 pm

    R.Dave: you keep coming back to the glorifying crime as if that is a marker of something important. Can you show me any aspect of US entertainment that doesn’t glorify crime?

    We have endless reruns of Bones, Criminal Minds, Law&Order, Cops. What do you call that? And before you go all “gang-banging and gangsta this and gangsta that” we also have endless reruns of the Sopranos. Oh, and then there was Prison Break. LOL.

  34. Jim
    March 1, 2011 at 5:13 pm

    Angel H.: Just so you know, saying Black people dress like criminals and are understandably mistaken for such is racist.

    Well that makes a lot black parents racist. This mode of dress and the music associated with it were a very live issue of discussion for a number of years, starting in the 80’s.

    What’s racist though is buying into it and allowing it to influence your interpretation of a scene you see. Young+black+dressed like gangsters=criminal activity – definitely is racist.

    The video is superfical, but at least it raises awareness. It’s superficial because white privilege is much more pervasive with respect to crime and the criminal justice system than this little snippet shows. It distorts not only who goes to prison in raw numbers, but in what acts get labelled as crimes, how much punishment is meted out for the same acts and also wrt to victims, which victims count and which don’t, which crimes get investigated and prosecuted. This intersects with class and gender privilege but that’s another discussion.

  35. tinfoil hattie
    March 1, 2011 at 5:28 pm

    Interestingly, this video doesn’t show the third scenario, which aired on OWN. I saw it last week.

    In the third scenario, a beautiful blonde white woman is stealing the bike. Not only do people not confront her, but several different men (much older than she is) help her steal the bike.

  36. marle
    March 1, 2011 at 6:26 pm

    tinfoil hattie: Interestingly, this video doesn’t show the third scenario, which aired on OWN.I saw it last week.In the third scenario, a beautiful blonde white woman is stealing the bike.Not only do people not confront her, but several different men (much older than she is) help her steal the bike.  

    That sounded interesting, so I found the video (yeah, I only can’t watch videos while I’m at work):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ea9Rg5760tE

    Only one person calls her out on it, and then her husband goes and helps the actress steal it. So many people helped her that by the end she got cocky and just started asking men for help. “Is this your bike?” “No but it’s not yours so who cares?” and they go ahead and help her anyways. That’s a whole different discussion right there.

    When I watched the video of the white guy, I thought that maybe the reason people didn’t stop him was because they feared a confrontation, especially since the two people most upset were elderly and couldn’t take him in a fight and probably didn’t have cell phones, though they said they were going to call the cops. That theory was blown out of the water when an elderly guy attempted to steal the black guy’s tools in the next video.

    I also have to say now that I really don’t get R. Dave’s idea that the actors where wearing very different clothing. The white actor even had his hat to the side. So the shirt looked big on the black guy, he has the type of build that everything looks big on him, and his pants weren’t sagging or anything. The clothes are definitely not different enough to cause completely different judgments. As for scripted lines, how can you have scripted lines when you’re dealing with people don’t know you’re acting or that it’s a setup? It looks like both of them (and the white woman, for that matter) were given the same guidelines (don’t say it’s their bike, ask who’s bike it is, ask why someone cares if it’s not their bike, etc). All of them made it very clear they were stealing the bike. And it’s very clear exactly what caused the differences in the reactions.

  37. konkonsn
    March 1, 2011 at 6:29 pm

    I’ve seen videos from this show which other people linked to. The domestic violence one, the racism in the store one, and the car stealing one. So I didn’t watch this one all the way through because I knew how it was going to end, and I was horribly disturbed by those other videos I watched awhile ago. Though I guess that’s white privilege too, getting to pick and choose the type of painful, racist things you see.

  38. marle
    March 1, 2011 at 6:51 pm

    konkonsn: I’ve seen videos from this show which other people linked to.The domestic violence one, the racism in the store one, and the car stealing one.So I didn’t watch this one all the way through because I knew how it was going to end, and I was horribly disturbed by those other videos I watched awhile ago.Though I guess that’s white privilege too, getting to pick and choose the type of painful, racist things you see.  

    Hey, at least you’re not using white privilege to decide that the slight variations in their clothes and dialog made aaaallll the difference.

  39. preying mantis
    March 1, 2011 at 9:58 pm

    Someone (I think it was Michael Moore, for TV Nation) did a similar thing in response to complaints that NYC cabbies would not stop for black guys. Only the white actor was a violent felon, and the black actor was like Sidney Poitier. And they did all sorts of stuff to make the black actor less threatening, like put him in a suit…with a cast on his arm…holding a baby with the other.

    I mean, you can say “Maybe that individual cabbie was ten minutes from being off duty or not feeling well or just having a bad day or didn’t see the guy in time” or whatever, but you can’t honestly make that kind of argument for all twenty on-duty, fairless cabs that blew past the black guy while the white guy got a cab in thirty seconds flat on the same corner, or blew past the black guy to stop for the white guy thirty feet later.

  40. Velder
    March 2, 2011 at 9:44 am

    I want to see all the filmed scenes that ended up on the proverbial ‘cuting-room floor’. The final product is just too clean and tidy.

  41. March 2, 2011 at 11:51 am

    Jim:

    You do realize that you’re using the whole “They say it about themselves, so why can’t we say it?” tactic, don’t you?

    Also, debates about how mode of dress influences or is influenced by criminality has been around for hundreds of years. It didn’t start with hip-hop and it won’t end there. So this garbage about being able to prejudge someone based on their clothes and being able to justify it because of a music video somewhere is pure nonsense and yes, racist.

  42. Azalea
    March 2, 2011 at 5:32 pm

    Jadey: @ Marle – it’s an expose news show where first passers-by are exposed to a young white male actor behaving suspiciously with a bike in a park, and while many appear concerned that he might be stealing it, generally most of them don’t get involved or only briefly confront him. When the young white actor is replaced by a young black male actor in similar clothing performing similar suspicious behaviours, the passers-by are much more confrontational, crowds form, yelling ensues, and some people start calling 911 immediately.There’s another video out there from the same show that I found even more compelling. It’s part of their series on how people will react to someone behaving in an overtly racist manner, in this case a store clerk in a high-end fashion boutique blatantly disregarding a well-dressed black woman trying to get assistance in the store (both are actors). One white female customer burst into tears as soon as she realized that something overtly racist was occurring, as she later explained not so much because it was racist but because it was happening right there in front of her. When she began crying, the black actor playing the object of the racist dismissal hugged and comforted her.That is white privilege.  (Quote this comment?)

    BAM!

  43. Azalea
    March 2, 2011 at 5:38 pm

    Being black (or “appearing” to be any race mixed with black) means that you’re stigmitized with the stereotype that you are a criminal, that you are lazy, that you are ignorant, promiscious and/or overly sexualized and that you are violent. This does not surprise me in the least bit.

  44. blacktsalagi
    March 2, 2011 at 6:42 pm

    A lot of great comments here.
    I always love to see these “experiments” done. If I remember correctly there was the “white doll vs black doll” and in the 90s Clinton spent millions of taxpayers money to “prove” that “racism” still existed in the U.S. Nothing seems to come of these results or realizations though. We seem to just forget about them and move on with our lives.
    Thanks for your comment R.Dave. I agree with you 100% about the study being more controlled. Although I seriously believe that the outcome would’ve been the same or very similar at best.
    You are also right on about how “blacks” adopt “dress and lingo” that has been popularized by “negative” images.
    Fitting in or not can often be challenging. “Keeping it real” is often a mistake and for many people, to do so, would “NOT” agree with some people’s outward appearance.
    The plain truth is that we all see “black / brown” people , females, teenagers / young adults, handicap, poor, anyone who we just “don’t like” as burdens on society.

  45. Isidore
    March 2, 2011 at 9:58 pm

    These types of videos are great for holding up to people who claim that racism doesn’t exist. But I think most people who watch them think, “That’s awful, but *I* would never do that.” But you do. You do it every day, there’s just no one following you around with a video camera to document your hypocrisy.

  46. Azalea
    March 3, 2011 at 11:45 am

    I agree with Isidore, it happens a LOT. But I will say this, I have been the beneficiary of kindness from white people who were not being watched, who were not under pressure who just saw a young pregnant woman trying to get over a hump of snow half her height and they asked me if I needed help and they carried me over it. The racism comes in when you factor the people around us who got upset and made very snide remarks about the whole thing.

    But these videos show peple things they don’t want to see and real life exposes hypocrisy many will never admit to.

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