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Jill has been blogging for Feministe since 2005.
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72 Responses

  1. Vertigo
    Vertigo April 20, 2011 at 12:59 pm |

    I wonder if he would call a man in his 40s with no children a ‘boy’. I think not.

  2. gretel
    gretel April 20, 2011 at 1:01 pm |

    Is this Rich Santos character 4 years old?

  3. andrea
    andrea April 20, 2011 at 1:06 pm |

    Don’t sweat it Jill, he’s wrong on both ends. I have two kids, a job and a car loan, and I still don’t think I’m a woman, or a lady.

    Vertigo:
    I wonder if he would call a man in his 40s with no children a ‘boy’.I think not.

    Probably a ‘guy’ rather than a man or a boy.

  4. Jadey
    Jadey April 20, 2011 at 1:10 pm |

    Jill:
    Also he uses the term “female” in the place of “woman” (or “girl” or whatever), which I cannot stand.

    Only real people get nouns. The rest of us just have to settle for adjectives.

  5. samanthab
    samanthab April 20, 2011 at 1:13 pm |

    Obviously I agree with the point made here, but, probably mostly due to its brevity, there’s a squicky tinge of classism to the post. I should be able to be a childless lady who isn’t in the highest stratospheres of power and still be treated with the same goddamned respect my dudely counterpart is. I shouldn’t have to be goddamned Secretary of State to be treated decently. If that dude gets treated with ANY respect at all for those two sentence paragraphs of utter inanity, then he owes it to the rest of society to be generous as all hell.

  6. Raja
    Raja April 20, 2011 at 1:14 pm |

    wow, shes really pathetic.

  7. gretel
    gretel April 20, 2011 at 1:15 pm |

    “Female” can be a noun or an adjective. We’re versatile, woo hoo!

    It can also mean a “pistillate plant” according to my dictionary. I’m going to assume he meant that.

    Jadey: Only real people get nouns. The rest of us just have to settle for adjectives.

  8. Valerie
    Valerie April 20, 2011 at 1:16 pm |

    I run into this all the time when I tell people I don’t want kids. For the last 8 years, I’ve been told to “just wait” because it’s “only a matter of time” before I will realize I “want to grow up and have babies.” Yes, the quotation marks are necessary.

    The best part is the circular logic used to dimiss the fact that the connecting nerve between my brain and my uterus somehow got compromised along the way. You can’t call yourself a woman until you have or want babies, because wanting to have babies is what makes you a woman. HEY THANKS.

    By the way: Despite being told that my biological clock will start to tick loudly at my current age, I’m even more opposed to having children than I was 8 years ago. Does this mean that in a few more years I will go through un-puberty and find myself as a very precocious middle school student? A girl can only hope, or something.

  9. gretel
    gretel April 20, 2011 at 1:21 pm |

    Also, does anyone else have the White Town song stuck in their head?

    Now you do.

  10. Sheelzebub
    Sheelzebub April 20, 2011 at 1:24 pm |

    Isn’t he the same d00d who wrote this dreck?

    Color me unsurprised that:

    1) He refers to girls and women as “females”*
    2) He refers to women his own age as “girls”
    3) He only considers a woman a woman once she has a baby. And then, when she gets older, she’s a lady.

    Where a man is just a man. Always.

    *This has become very considerate short-hand for these d00ds to use, however. If someone uses “female” in place of “woman” in the comments section of any blog I know to not take them seriously. When I was doing the online dating thing, I knew to skip right over the profiles that used this.

  11. StandTall - The Activist
    StandTall - The Activist April 20, 2011 at 1:27 pm |

    I dont mind if my friends call me a girl but I mind if my society does. In Nigeria some pple define womanhood by marriage or by having children. It is never a matter of if you are now an adult. And when they call you a girl, they have a way of treating you immaturedly and belittle you. If the concept of adulthood is not linked with how pple see you, I wont mind if am called a girl but since it is, you better call me a woman or a lady!

  12. Comrade Kevin
    Comrade Kevin April 20, 2011 at 1:32 pm |

    If I ever use “female” in adjective form as described here in the comments it’s usually because

    A. I’m writing a post and I have already used woman two sentences before, therefore I am seeking a synonym.
    B. Because I was always taught to write with parallel structure, I usually make sure to balance the usage with the adjective “male” when referring to a man later in the piece.

  13. Clarissa
    Clarissa April 20, 2011 at 1:37 pm |

    This is precisely the attitude that my mother has towards these things. It is very sad to be exposed to such a limited understanding of womanhood from one’s early childhood.

  14. Lori
    Lori April 20, 2011 at 1:45 pm |

    I am constantly amazed to hear grown men and women using the term “girls” when referring to adult women. It’s really patronizing. I corrected a guy at work once recently (he’s 26, I’m 39), and he told me to “relax” and not to be so “PC.” Right. Relax. Asshat.

  15. Kristen J.
    Kristen J. April 20, 2011 at 1:49 pm |

    I wonder if he’s one of those men you are instructed to settle for. I mean come on girls, sure he’s a sexist piece of shit, but with a little work he could be a sexist asshat. And you could become the woman who gives birth to his babies! WIN-WIN!!

  16. Personal Failure
    Personal Failure April 20, 2011 at 1:52 pm |

    Hey, Valerie, do you also get “oh, you’ll totally want the baby once you have it!” Yeah, and what if I don’t?

    I’ve also been directly told that children are what make you a grown up, with the clear implication that I am not a grown up because I don’t have children, and that I don’t want children because I don’t want to grow up.

    I told the last person who said that that it was sad that she needed a baby to grow up because I managed it all on my own over a decade ago.

    Funny, she seemed to think I was the rude one.

  17. Anonacademic
    Anonacademic April 20, 2011 at 1:54 pm |

    This would be top troll candidate #1 in my book if the comment had been left here. I know it’s wrong to laugh at something so terrible, but I couldn’t stop myself. It’s the progression from “girl” to “woman” to “ladddeeeee.” I really hate the word “lady” (obviously – although being called “female” is definitely worse), but the idea that’s it’s some kind of fertility-cased cursus honorum. That’s too funny, really.

  18. Ursula
    Ursula April 20, 2011 at 1:59 pm |

    So is a 13yo who gets pregnant and has a baby a “woman” by his logic?

  19. cat
    cat April 20, 2011 at 2:04 pm |

    My grandmother’s aunt never had children and lived into her nineties (according to family lore, she never had children by choice, flaunting her sometimes illegal use of birth control and throwing a party when Roe was decided). So, at the age of 60 (at which she was still employed at the same store where her husband of 40 years worked), she was still a girl? Also,her husband (who was two years older), by the same logic, was a still a boy.

  20. Ari
    Ari April 20, 2011 at 2:06 pm |

    So then by his argument a thirteen year old girl who has a baby is now a woman? I’ve watched a couple of episodes of MTV’s Teen Mom, and I don’t want to slam the teenagers on that show, but I think a lot of what is filmed shows that these teenagers are not magically transformed into mature adults because of their babies.

  21. Arkady
    Arkady April 20, 2011 at 2:12 pm |

    Heh, I did once hear an elderly female relative refer to her nephew as ‘boy!’: this being at said nephew’s 70th birthday party. She did like to belittle people however…

  22. konkonsn
    konkonsn April 20, 2011 at 2:13 pm |

    So…no such thing as a transwoman (unless he counts adoption as having a baby). Transgirls only?

  23. Mimi
    Mimi April 20, 2011 at 2:15 pm |

    Being called a lady also has some nasty racist baggage – I was taught by my grandmother that a black adult female was a woman and a white adult female was a lady, done so as to express your racism without being overtly racist. Um, hurray?

  24. ruby falls
    ruby falls April 20, 2011 at 2:42 pm |

    I don’t know what I despise more – the book that lead me to this post or that this pile of unwarranted ego with his ‘Thank Heaven For Little Girls’ attitude. Seriously dude. Gross.

  25. Jess
    Jess April 20, 2011 at 3:39 pm |

    I will admit to a terrible tendancy to refere to women as “female” and men as “male”…only because when I went through basic training you were not allowed to call someone a man or a woman…it had to be male or female. About the tenth time I did insane numbers of pushups as punishment for slipping up, it became a habit.

    That said, wow, what a narrow way of defining people! I hate it when people call me a girl. I am 31 years old. I am an adult. Treat me like one! The fact that I have children should not even be taken into consideration. My twin sister does not have kids (and never will, she is firmly child-free). Does that mean she is a girl and I am woman? Thats just…silly.

  26. DP
    DP April 20, 2011 at 4:26 pm |

    This has probably been covered but – what do you say when addressing a group of women, of the same rough age as you?? Worse yet, what if it’s mixed?!

    My instinctive go-to is guys, but I’m aware it’s problematic. Ladies has a really strange feel to it – “Hellloooo, ladies.”

    “Hey, women!” is just strange.

    “Y’all” would be great but I ain’t southern.

    “You (pl.)” would be fine but what about when you’re giving directions to various groups of people, i.e. “You (Team A) do this, you (Team B) do this, you (Team C),” etc.

    I end up just using “you guys” and feeling bad about it. But there must be a better way!

  27. Nahida
    Nahida April 20, 2011 at 4:58 pm |

    DP:
    This has probably been covered but – what do you say when addressing a group of women, of the same rough age as you?? Worse yet, what if it’s mixed?!

    My instinctive go-to is guys, but I’m aware it’s problematic. Ladies has a really strange feel to it – “Hellloooo, ladies.”

    “Hey, women!” is just strange.

    “Y’all” would be great but I ain’t southern.

    “You (pl.)” would be fine but what about when you’re giving directions to various groups of people, i.e. “You (Team A) do this, you (Team B) do this, you (Team C),” etc.

    I end up just using “you guys” and feeling bad about it. But there must be a better way!

    I say, “Hi everyone.”

  28. Lis
    Lis April 20, 2011 at 4:59 pm |

    I’m so glad Sheelzebub pointed it out–he’s “Dirty Snow” man who says that men don’t like women who have education or backbones or sexual experience! Wow. What memories.

    It appears the only way he can get through the day without his ego shrivelling up and hiding in his left sock is to belittle women as much as possible while still thinking of himself as a good guy.

  29. Cimmer
    Cimmer April 20, 2011 at 4:59 pm |

    @DP -

    Saying “you guys” and being called “you guys” rubs me the wrong way too. The full explanation of why is long, but basically I will be down with you referring to me as a “guy” when society is 100% down with me referring to groups of men/mixed groups as ladies/gals.

    That said, I use “you all” / “y’all” (though I’m also not Southern) and “everyone/everybody.” When referring to small groups: “you two” “you three” etc. It takes some effort initially, but once I stopped inserting “guys” everywhere I found that often a substitute word wasn’t even necessary. I.E. : “all of you guys” vs. “All of you”

    Some may argue it’s just semantics, but I believe words -especially how we address each other- are too powerful to not be scrutinized.

  30. Nahida
    Nahida April 20, 2011 at 5:00 pm |

    Or “this group will go to the corner and this group will follow me to the hall” if there are several groups.

  31. DP
    DP April 20, 2011 at 5:04 pm |

    Hm…everyone is interesting. That might work, and is equally appropriate in casual or professional settings.

    I totally get why “you guys” would rub the wrong way – I’d feel weird if someone called me part of “ladies.” But these things are embedded deep and require conscious reconsideration.

    Is “ladies” OK as a man, addressing a group of women? Or is that still weird?

  32. Thomas MacAulay Millar
    Thomas MacAulay Millar April 20, 2011 at 5:07 pm |

    Folks. There are very few situations calling for collective address where “folks” won’t work, and those tend to be formal, so that something like “members” or “my fellow Americans” suggest themselves.

  33. Verity Khat
    Verity Khat April 20, 2011 at 5:17 pm |

    My mom threw me a (private, just the two of us) “Happy Woman’s Day” party when I got my period. I was all of 11, so it was cute. But it was obvious that even though I was now biologically grown-up, no one actually expected me to be a woman yet.

    Despite the fact that, according to Mr Rich, I could have been one 9 months later (with some dudely interference).

    This man needs to examine his definitions, for real.

    Now that I am, I suppose, actually a woman, I tend to use “women” or “ladies” for women/girls I don’t know and “girls” for my friends. Male-folk of all ages are usually “guys” or “dudes” (I grew up in CA, sue me).

  34. Tori
    Tori April 20, 2011 at 5:17 pm |

    Is “ladies” OK as a man, addressing a group of women? Or is that still weird?

    Personally, I’m a little uncomfortable with the classist implications and rigid gender expectations I associate with “ladies.” However, I also understand that people who use it might be more actively searching for a term that they view as polite and respectful.

  35. Kimberly
    Kimberly April 20, 2011 at 5:23 pm |

    I use ‘folks’ as well. It’s substituted in pretty nicely in most situations.

  36. DP
    DP April 20, 2011 at 5:23 pm |

    Thomas MacAulay Millar:
    Folks.There are very few situations calling for collective address where “folks” won’t work, and those tend to be formal, so that something like “members” or “my fellow Americans” suggest themselves.

    Folks is good too, hadn’t thought of that perhaps because it’s so, well…folksy.

    However perhaps I will simply transition to using “My fellow Americans” in any and all social situations. Except those with foreigners, I guess.

  37. outrageandsprinkles
    outrageandsprinkles April 20, 2011 at 5:27 pm |

    I work in retail and often have to greet mixed groups or groups of all women. I use “folks” or “y’all” (and I too am not southern). If I am checking back with a pair or group of customers it might be “Are you two/folks still finding everything alright?” Many people may not mind being called “guys” but since I don’t know I avoid it for the most part. As a woman (OOPS I MEAN GIRL, NO BABIES YET) I don’t feel as weird about calling a group of women “ladies” as a man might feel but I still feel “folks” or is generally a good bet.

  38. Verity Khat
    Verity Khat April 20, 2011 at 5:40 pm |

    Just for everyone’s amusement:

    When I was in college, “the girls” was always understood to refer to our close-knit group of 7 women and 2 men. Our “Token Men” had absolutely no problem with this terminology!

  39. Valerie
    Valerie April 20, 2011 at 5:56 pm |

    Personal Failure: I’ll try that tactic next time both my womanhood and adulthood are questioned by the absence of babies in my life.

    And yes, others have shared their benevolent wisdom with me that having a kid makes you want to have the kid more. “Having a baby changes you.” Oh really? And it never occurred to you that those very changes you’re all smug about are the very reasons why perhaps not everyone wants to have a baby?

    Maybe I should just squeeze one out, and then when I am in love with my baby, I can hop in a time machine to go back in time and high-five myself before having the baby, knowing how much I’d love it once it arrived. It works that way. Really.

    On the topic of wanting kids more, have you ever known people who alleviate the headaches caused by infants learning to do things like talk and walk by having more babies to keep themselves in the New Baby Honeymoon forevermore? Those are a special breed of self-righteous grownups right there.

  40. Kristen J.
    Kristen J. April 20, 2011 at 6:11 pm |

    @DP,

    In business settings, typically drop the “everyone” and then take a moment to smile, make eye contact with everyone. YMMV.

  41. Jessica Isabel
    Jessica Isabel April 20, 2011 at 7:08 pm |

    My problem with ‘female’ is that it refers to physical anatomy, whereas ‘woman’ refers to presented gender identity which we’ve been socialized to conform to one way or the other. To call someone a ‘female’ is to infer they possess certain genitalia. It says nothing about their gender identity. You don’t know if someone is ‘male’ or ‘female’ unless you are well-versed in their physical and mental anatomy. You can often infer gender identity through social cues like dress, hairstyle, and personal affectations, but you can still be wrong.

  42. anna
    anna April 20, 2011 at 7:38 pm |

    My problem with “female” is that it could refer to any female creature, such as a cow, monkey, etc. Woman refers to a human being. As such, you often see “female” from MRAs and pick-up artists who describe women’s behavior as if we really were stupid animals. “See how the females are hard-wired to respond to your dominating behavior” and such.

  43. Tei Tetua
    Tei Tetua April 20, 2011 at 7:49 pm |

    I remember being in a conversation about this once and a woman who grew up in the South said she was taught that up to some undefined age, a woman was a “girl” and after that a “lady” but never a “woman”. Now I wonder if this is a racial thing, and the tradition was that “woman” meant black woman, and even people who weren’t racist continued it.

  44. Nahida
    Nahida April 20, 2011 at 7:53 pm |

    Tei Tetua:
    I remember being in a conversation about this once and a woman who grew up in the South said she was taught that up to some undefined age, a woman was a “girl” and after that a “lady” but never a “woman”. Now I wonder if this is a racial thing, and the tradition was that “woman” meant black woman, and even people who weren’t racist continued it.

    In my mother’s culture (not American), “woman” is used like a cuss word.

  45. Virginia
    Virginia April 20, 2011 at 7:55 pm |

    The author’s bio says that “he finds charm in stupidity.”

    He must find himself incredibly charming.

  46. Nahida
    Nahida April 20, 2011 at 7:55 pm |

    Eek, I specified that my mother’s culture isn’t American because revealing it by name would reveal the race people group me with and I don’t identify–not because I was “othering” her or being US centric.

  47. Christine
    Christine April 20, 2011 at 8:21 pm |

    How on Earth does this clownish man-boy have his own column?

    My dad has always used “dudes and dudettes” to refer to a mixed group. I know not why, and I would only recommend this to people who wish to sound terminally dorky.

  48. nico
    nico April 20, 2011 at 8:35 pm |

    Hmm, guess I’ll never be a “woman”. Oh well, I look forward to maybe someday being an 80 year old “girl”.
    Don’t even get me started on “woman” vs. “lady”. “Lady” seems to be a completely arbitrary title that dudes can use to keep you in your place, and that can be yanked away at a moments notice whenever one of them disaproves of you in some way. If I had my way no one would be refered to as a “lady” again, ever.

  49. MrsDragon
    MrsDragon April 20, 2011 at 8:48 pm |

    Nahida: I say, “Hi everyone.”

    I’ve adopted “You all” as a way of embracing “y’all” without the twang. Works a charm. : )

  50. zuzu
    zuzu April 20, 2011 at 8:50 pm |

    Sheelzebub: she’s a lady.

    Great. Now I’ve got a Tom Jones earworm.

  51. GallingGalla
    GallingGalla April 20, 2011 at 9:07 pm |

    konkonsn:
    So…no such thing as a transwoman (unless he counts adoption as having a baby).Transgirls only?

    I doubt he’d grant us even that. Someone who is as gender essentialist as that d00d won’t even acknowledge our gender by calling us “girls”.

  52. Bushfire
    Bushfire April 20, 2011 at 9:19 pm |

    if you want to be extra-creepy, try “gals.”

    Why is “gals” creepy? I use it once in a while.

    Usually I use “folks”.

  53. Bushfire
    Bushfire April 20, 2011 at 9:50 pm |

    Gals” is creepy why some dude is like “Heeeeey gals”

    Huh. I’ve never heard that. Sounds creepy though- I hope I never do hear it.

  54. Tony
    Tony April 20, 2011 at 10:42 pm |

    I’ve never once been in a situation where it was appropriate to use “gals” or it didn’t seem awkward. The word has always seemed extremely dated, and a visit to Google’s Ngram viewer confirms: the “gals” peaked in the 1940s. BUT, interestingly enough, the “guys” also peaked in the 1940s, declined until about 1960, then took off. So the 1960s was the real diverging point between “guys” and “gals”

  55. Jamie Jeans
    Jamie Jeans April 21, 2011 at 12:42 am |

    Yeah, to agree with a commenter before, I was also under the impression that age had to do with the use of girl and woman. So if you’re mature and responsible, regardless of if you’re a parent or not, then you’re a woman, who is an adult. Lady also came with connotations of class, although I honestly never equated it with racism until now. Amazing how loaded language can be, huh?

    Heck, I’d be hard pressed to call my nieces, the oldest of whom is graduating high school in June and the youngest who is only a year behind her, girls. They’re way too mature for that.

  56. Caity
    Caity April 21, 2011 at 12:42 am |

    @Jess:

    Yeah, pretty much the only situations I’ve been in where using “male” and “female” to refer to people in every day conversation wasn’t weird were when I was doing army stuff or in a medical-type environment. I think it’s because in the military the terms are used to make statements a bit more clinical/professional/detached/objective sounding. Same for medicine. “Woman” and “man” have all these other connotations, so it’s better to use a more emotionally neutral description.

    I guess the real problem with some guys using “female” is that they are using it to make women sound more like somethings rather than someones when they would never do that when talking to a man. Medical and military personnel do that to everyone, so it’s a totally different matter.

    But I guess I’m just saying something all of you know anyway.

  57. timothynakayama
    timothynakayama April 21, 2011 at 12:51 am |

    I’m not sure where I read this, maybe an anthropology book or something, but I remembered it said that in some cultures, a girl becomes a woman when menstruation starts. I don’t think that’s applicable to today, though, where you see girls starting menstruation as early as 8.

  58. Jess
    Jess April 21, 2011 at 9:58 am |

    @ Caity:

    Well, since I work both in military and civilian healthcare, yeah, I totally get what you are saying. The hard part is breaking out of the habit. I agree that in a non military, non medical setting, it just seems wrong to refere to women as “females”. But when 8-20 hours of your day requires that you do just that, it gets hard to NOT do it the rest of the time.

  59. Anna
    Anna April 21, 2011 at 10:03 am |

    DP:
    Hm…everyone is interesting. That might work, and is equally appropriate in casual or professional settings.

    I totally get why “you guys” would rub the wrong way – I’d feel weird if someone called me part of “ladies.” But these things are embedded deep and require conscious reconsideration.

    Is “ladies” OK as a man, addressing a group of women? Or is that still weird?

    It’s context. I, as a woman, don’t worry about calling ladies “ladies”, but for a mixed group, I prefer “folks”. If I get called “ladies” along with a group and we’re all women, and the person calling is a man, I wouldn’t really take issue with it, personally. Unless he says it a certain way, which is not yet something I’ve encountered, really. “You guys,” is not terrible, but I’d probably make a face. I don’t like it. I would take issue with “girls” definitely. Most definitely. I wouldn’t take issue with someone saying, “Women!” but I would be kind of weirded out, and I’d probably make fun, though that isn’t really mature. Anyone who uses “females” to refer to women, in any context, is looking for a beat-down.

    As a remotely related aside:
    I remember my father referring to parties in a marriage as “man and wife” and I gave him “the face.” He *laughed* when he saw me, so he *knew* what the problem was. I told him “husband and wife” to correct him. “Husband and husband in some cases. Wife and wife in others still.” That made him kinda contrite.

  60. Kyra
    Kyra April 21, 2011 at 11:51 am |

    “We are not girls, we are women.”

    I said: “No, I call most females girls. Women are different than girls.”

    Is that a circular argument or a red herring? I can’t remember.

    She corrects him and he defends it not by addressing her objection (“we are not girls, we are women”), but by reiterating his commitment to the phrasing she objects to (“I call most females ‘girls.’”) (Also, the “no” is quite rude, effectively telling her she’s wrong for objecting because he does the thing to which she’s objecting.)

    Sorry, logic finals are next week and I’m a bit deep into the books.

  61. peabow
    peabow April 21, 2011 at 7:57 pm |

    DP:
    This has probably been covered but – what do you say when addressing a group of women, of the same rough age as you?? Worse yet, what if it’s mixed?!

    I’ve been saying “hey friends” a lot lately! I’m growing to like it for adult friends, although it did start with how i address the swim classes I teach.

  62. Bushfire
    Bushfire April 22, 2011 at 12:01 am |

    I’ve been saying “hey friends” a lot lately! I’m growing to like it for adult friends, although it did start with how i address the swim classes I teach.

    That reminds me of a lady I used to know, probably in her fifties, who used to call us co-workers “Hey, kids”. She did it in an affectionate way, and I always thought it was cute. You really have to have the right personality for that.

    In certain situations, you could use other fun words, like “sportsfans” or “lovelies” or “rock stars”…

  63. syfr
    syfr April 22, 2011 at 10:08 am |

    Why is this jerk writing for a women’s magazine, anyway?

  64. Matthew
    Matthew April 23, 2011 at 7:36 pm |

    I’m sure you will be a grand lady, If you aren’t already.

  65. DouglasG
    DouglasG April 24, 2011 at 9:18 pm |

    I am the only person I know who insists on parity, which usually entails correcting people talking about college basketball. But I have to keep asking myself whether it’s ethical to continue watching singles figure skating, as Men’s/Ladies’ drives me nuts. At least Wimbledon has Gentlemen’s events to match the Ladies’ events.

  66. andrea
    andrea April 26, 2011 at 2:14 pm |

    Bushfire:
    In certain situations, you could use other fun words, like “sportsfans” or “lovelies” or “rock stars”…

    I really like ‘Lovelies’.. like Dame Edna. Wasn’t there a Care Bear who referred to people as ‘Sports Fans?’

    I sometimes like to us a very simple “Greetings, All.”

  67. Chantelle
    Chantelle May 6, 2011 at 9:10 am |

    syfr: Why is this jerk writing for a women’s magazine, anyway?

    Women’s mags are hardly the bastion of feminism… he fits right in

  68. Valerie
    Valerie May 6, 2011 at 11:41 am |

    I know this conversation is mostly over, but I found an article today about how having kids severely impacts a woman’s earning potential, which is somewhat relevant to the debate. Painful enough as that was, it was this comment that made me both laugh and bludgeon my head against the wall for comfort:

    “Women are biologically made to get joy from rearing a new life. If they enjoyed conquering more (like us men) then the species would die off.”

    Lolwat?

    http://www.bnet.com/blog/business-research/that-8217s-one-expensive-bundle-of-joy/1463

  69. Vigée
    Vigée May 6, 2011 at 12:48 pm |

    Valerie:

    “Women are biologically made to get joy from rearing a new life. If they enjoyed conquering more (like us men) then the species would die off.”

    It’s totally true! I’ve been meaning to rear some new life in the form of an herb garden for a while, and I love rearing the heck out of my dogs. I mean, I could just rear away all day long!

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