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  1. Yonmei
    Yonmei May 1, 2011 at 1:58 pm |

    Johann Hari links the RW to USUncut in this interview.

  2. Kristen J.
    Kristen J. May 1, 2011 at 2:30 pm |

    Its great to hear the labor movement rallies. M & I planned to be at the Phoenix Rising Rally today, but I’m stuck in bed with bronchitis. The rally doesn’t start until 1:30, so anyone else who is in the area…

    http://maydayunited.org/actions/list-of-events/arizona/

    As an aside, May 1 is also Lei Day in Hawaii…a celebration of kindness and inclusivity.

  3. Yonmei
    Yonmei May 1, 2011 at 2:33 pm |

    I was thinking, also, sadly, that one of the things I will now always associate the end of April 2011 with, isn’t the expensive travesty for which people were arrested, it’s Joanna Russ’s death.

    I first read The Female Man when I was 17. For 7th February 1994, the 25th anniversary of the date on which Joanna says

    As I have said before, I (not the one above, please) had an experience on the seventh of February last,
    nineteen-sixty-nine.
    I turned into a man.
    I had been a man before, but only briefly and in a crowd.
    You would not have noticed anything, had you been there.

    I sent 25 feminist postcards to feminist SF fan friends.

    She was an amazing writer, a dancer on the sea of words, one of the great creators. She lived not by writing but by teaching, and wrote less as a result: she said again and again that you keep yourself honest as a writer by not depending on writing to earn your living. She was scarily intelligent, fearsomely well-read, wonderfully funny.

    Celebrate the dead and fight like hell for the living.

  4. Rinth de Shadley
    Rinth de Shadley May 1, 2011 at 2:43 pm |

    The government wants to break up unions for the same reason it tries to divide us in other ways: women vs. men, black vs. white, immigrant vs. native-born. When people stand together for justice and fair treatment, they have a chance to do amazing things like in Egypt (where they have less inequality than here in America).

    We need to stand together for what’s right. Supporting labor is one way to do it.

  5. kloncke
    kloncke May 1, 2011 at 3:06 pm |

    Hell yeah! Happy May Day y’all.

    It’s about more than just symbolism, after all–it’s about organizing for right here, right now. Remembering the past, as Mother Jones said, is important, but the “fight like hell for the living” bit is the one that really matters. We want to build on history, not just nod our heads solemnly at it.

    Thanks for saying this: hella important! This year also saw a prison strike in Georgia, an important reminder of the “industrial complex” part of Prison-Industrial Complex, and a prime example of the overlap between labor and incarceration. We need to be able to adjust to changing conditions of capital and labor in order to fight back with effective means now, not just using early-20th-century union history as some sort of transhistorical playbook. As US unions have become megabusinesses unto themselves (with many paid union organizers having to sign a no-strike clause in their own contract!), and leadership becoming divorced from the rank-and-file, not to mention the special challenges of organizing undocumented workers, it’s imperative that we engage with present conditions, as they are now.

  6. russ W
    russ W May 1, 2011 at 3:43 pm |

    A beautiful article! Countries around the world celebrate May Day which arose partly as a commemoration of the Haymarket Massacre in Chicago in 1884 on May 4th. Shamefully, the US purposely chose September for Labor Day to avoid any connection to Haymarket. Today, 200,000 people paraded in Turkey to celebrate May Day. Thank you, Turkey, you are rapidly becoming one of the most admired Nations in the world.

  7. russ W
    russ W May 1, 2011 at 3:43 pm |

    A beautiful article! Countries around the world celebrate May Day which arose partly as a commemoration of the Haymarket Massacre in Chicago in 1884 on May 4th. Shamefully, the US purposely chose September for Labor Day to avoid any connection to Haymarket. Today, 200,000 people paraded in Turkey to celebrate May Day. Thank you, Turkey, you are rapidly becoming one of the most admired Nations in the world.

  8. Happy May Day « Mystical Worlds

    [...] Day from an activist and feminist perspective http://www.feministe.us/blog/archives/2011/05/01/happy-may-day/ Peace out and Blessed be. LikeBe the first to like this [...]

  9. oldlady
    oldlady May 1, 2011 at 4:24 pm |

    This is such an important post. Should be read by many more than will read it.

  10. Natalia
    Natalia May 1, 2011 at 5:33 pm |

    According to the so-called yellow press, the highlight of today’s march of the Communist Party of Russia in Moscow was when people with rainbow flags randomly joined in. The riot police showed uncommon restraint and “politely asked” asked the GLBT activists to disengage, before a fight broke out. Seems rather sad, because the Communist Party (the mainstream branch) and Moscow’s gay rights activists do have a lot of stuff in common, especially wherein issues such as workplace discrimination are concerned.

  11. Sunday News Briefs May 1, 2011 | chatroulette girls

    [...] Happy May Day! — Feministe [...]

  12. Rebecca Kling
    Rebecca Kling May 1, 2011 at 5:56 pm |

    I was fortunate enough to attend the rededication ceremony in Chicago, at the same cemetery where my grandparents (who were active members of the US Communist party during their lives) are buried a few feet away from Emma Goldman. It was a really cool experience, and I’ve written up some thoughts (and shared some pictures) over at my blog.

  13. haley
    haley May 1, 2011 at 7:22 pm |

    Happy Mayday!

  14. Macha
    Macha May 1, 2011 at 8:05 pm |

    Happy May Day indeed! A celebration of life and rebirth – which I think fits nicely with the revolutions we’re seeing in the workers’ movements.

  15. Aaron W.
    Aaron W. May 1, 2011 at 8:51 pm |

    On the subject of May Day, I am fond of the following passage from the Illuminatus! Trillogy:

    As the earth turned on its axis and dawn reached city after city, hamlet after hamlet, farm after farm, mountain and valley after mountain and valley, it became obvious that May 1 would be bright and sunny almost everywhere.
    […]
    In Paris the Communists under the Red banner and the anarchists under the Black were preparing for the International Labor Solidarity Day, at which the usual factionalism and sectarianism would once again demonstrate the absolute lack of international labor solidarity. And in London, Berlin, a thousand cites, the Red and the Black would wave and the tongues of their partisans would wag, and the age-old longing for a classless society would once again manifest itself; while, in the same cites, an older name and an older purpose for that day would be commemorated in convent after convent and school after school where verses (far older than the name of Christianity) were sung to the Mother of God:
    Queen of the Angels
    Queen of the May

    […]
    But everywhere, in Asia and Africa as in Europe and the Americas, the members of the Oldest Religion were returning from their festivals, murmuring “Blessed be” as they parted, secure in their knowledge that the Mother of God was indeed still alive and had visited them at midnight, whether they knew her as Dian, Dan, Tan, Tana, Shakti, or even Erzulie.
    Queen of the Angels
    Queen of the May

    -Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson The Illuminatus! Trilogy Dell Trade Paperback: New York, 1988, page 657-658

    I think it speaks beautifully to the unity underlying our divisions, and to the need to join together to fight for what really are, for most of us, common goals. It also reminds me that, when we fall short, we have a chance to pick ourselves up and try again.

    Blessed be and happy May Day to all.

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