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Lauren founded this blog in 2001.
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21 Responses

  1. La Lubu
    La Lubu May 11, 2011 at 6:06 pm |

    There is a lot of speculation about Daniels running in the GOP presidential primaries in 2012. He’s a shoo-in, a relatively well-liked and successful governor who favors old-school conservative methods like privatization of public services and libertarian “live and let live” approaches to social issues. Daniels is seen as a move away from “populist evangelicalism” of the current GOP….

    THIS. Pay attention. Indiana is a Rust Belt state that has a considerable number of “blue” voters in its urban areas. I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see Daniels as the GOP pick, in an attempt to get Rust Belt swing voters (most of whom are not evangelicals and who take issue with the GOP’s strong emphasis on southern culture). The Rust Belt is going to make or break the next Presidential election. So. If you think, “why should I give a shit what happens to those rubes in Indiana?”….think again.

  2. Gretel
    Gretel May 11, 2011 at 6:13 pm |

    This will cause people to die. I am sure of that. I read in the New York Times that it will cut $3 million funding for STI screenings, birth control, and cancer screenings.

    Several “moderates” in my family have mentioned that they hope he would run for president (ugh, I know). I will be sure to inform them that there is nothing moderate about this guy.

    It’s hard to believe that Indiana’s government was blue for that brief moment in 2008.

  3. Icaarus
    Icaarus May 11, 2011 at 6:36 pm |

    I just love these “fiscal conserviatives” who seem to think that well rounded health care is a social issue, not a fiscal one. As was proven in Saskatchewan (you know the province that gave birth to the idea of “Canadian” health care) by introducing healthcare and not raising taxes for the next few years; Well rounded health care at worst is fiscally even. At best it saves the government net-net. So smart fiscal conservatives should bet the farm on health care organizations like Planned Parenthood, Red Cross, and whatever local pro bono health clinics exist in the state.

    P. S. I am a fiscal conservative who firmly believes that good health care lowers overall required state (or province) spending. As such my support of PP is because of the large volume of accomplishments of the organization, nothing more, nothing less.

  4. GumbyAnne
    GumbyAnne May 11, 2011 at 8:19 pm |

    “So smart fiscal conservatives should bet the farm on health care organizations like Planned Parenthood, Red Cross, and whatever local pro bono health clinics exist in the state.”

    Yes and yes!

  5. Michele
    Michele May 11, 2011 at 9:21 pm |

    My check for $500 goes out this weekend. Fucking morons. If you want to stop abortion, prevent unwanted pregnancies. Defunding PP is surely NOT going to achieve your goal.

  6. Marked Hoosier
    Marked Hoosier May 11, 2011 at 11:25 pm |

    All the stuff coming out of the statehouse this year has been sad, but this bill is just depressing.

    I will call and write, but I don’t think anyone will care or notice. Kinda like how the dems left the statehouse for a month and it barely got mentioned in national news.

    Oh and I totally believe Mitch will be the republican nominee, running all over the country in his My Man Mitch winnebago.

    Sigh.

  7. Marked Hoosier
    Marked Hoosier May 11, 2011 at 11:27 pm |

    Oh, and I can’t wait till our next governor Mike Pence.

    Sigh again.

  8. Really Mitch? « What is Talent? Musings on Art and Gender

    [...] the law’s constitutionality. There’s an excellent post outlining recent events over at Feministe. You can email Governor Mitch Daniels to explain the importance of family planning in fiscal [...]

  9. Mary
    Mary May 12, 2011 at 5:58 am |

    From what I hear, the funding cuts also affect PPIN’s disease intervention program, which monitors health providers in the state–not just PP clinics–for positive STD tests and notifies the patient’s partners for him. Horrible people, those dastardly PPIN folk.

    Annoyed/furious/concerned parties might also consider donating to the ACLU of Indiana, which is handling all the legal work with a staff of two overworked attorneys and a paralegal.

  10. Lauren
    Lauren May 12, 2011 at 7:25 am |

    Mary: Annoyed/furious/concerned parties might also consider donating to the ACLU of Indiana, which is handling all the legal work with a staff of two overworked attorneys and a paralegal.

    Good call!

    Michele: My check for $500 goes out this weekend.

    THANK YOU.

    La Lubu: Indiana is a Rust Belt state that has a considerable number of “blue” voters in its urban areas. I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see Daniels as the GOP pick, in an attempt to get Rust Belt swing voters (most of whom are not evangelicals and who take issue with the GOP’s strong emphasis on southern culture).

    Gretel: Several “moderates” in my family have mentioned that they hope he would run for president (ugh, I know).

    Special emphasis on Lubu’s and Gretel’s comments. Daniels appeals to this red state, blue-leaning voter because of his supposed moderate views. Until this year, his personal politics may have been socially conservative, but his concentration on fiscal politics made him a repeat governor in Indiana (despite some extremely unpopular privatization decisions and the time zone fiasco). *IF* he decides to run, he will run as a modest, moderate, scandal-free Rust Belt governor who was one of GWB’s trusted advisors and who doesn’t carry the social baggage that so many other GOP candidates will. It will be instructive to remember that this man signed in one of the most draconian health policies in the nation that defunded the healthcare of millions of women indefinitely to underline a point about abortion politics.

  11. Indiana Becomes the First State to Defund Planned Parenthood, Violating Federal Medicaid Law «

    [...] “…about half of all births in Indiana are funded by Medicaid today and PPIN estimates this will ‘cost the state $68 million [...]

  12. Ebonmuse
    Ebonmuse May 13, 2011 at 8:52 pm |

    I agree with the other commenters that Daniels is definitely trying to burnish his wingnut credentials for a presidential run – if not 2012, then 2016 (though the timing suggests it’ll be 2012).

    Although it’s no consolation for the people of Indiana, I have some hope that the Republican party has become so insane that any major presidential candidate who can survive a primary will be unelectable in the general.

  13. UnAttributableSpoon
    UnAttributableSpoon May 13, 2011 at 10:18 pm |

    I’m not in Indiana (my own state is freaking conservative to begin with…Wyoming), but I’m incandescent with rage and I don’t know what to do about it. I don’t have money I can donate, or much time that I can spend. But I want to do something, anything to challenge this.

  14. Thursday Link Roundup | BasBleuStocking

    [...] If you don’t already care that the state of Indiana has de-funded Planned Parenthood, here’s why you should. [...]

  15. La Lubu
    La Lubu May 14, 2011 at 9:47 am |

    Hey….I found this via Racialicious; this further confirms my suspicions that Daniels will be in pole position for the GOP, which will inevitably try and distance themselves from all the Stars-and-Bars waving.

    It doesn’t get much play in the media, but frankly, the Stars and Bars and portrayal of southern culture as the “Real America” truly pisses off a ton of the “white ethnic” (translation: people of southern and eastern European descent), moderate, working-class, swing-voters. If the GOP attaches itself to the Confederacy, it will have strong ramifications in the next election (especially if the Dems counter with emphasizing Obama’s immigrant heritage—-how the hard-working son of an immigrant rose to the Presidency).

    After I read that Telegraph article, I took my daughter to the “Y” for swim class. On the way there, Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Sweet Home Alabama” was playing on the radio. I thought back to the first time I heard that song, in the car with my father in 1974. He was fucking livid at the lyrics (which include “Watergate does not bother me” and “where the Governor’s true”–a reference to the famously segregationist George Wallace), cursing back at the radio. I remember exactly where we were—what street we were on and everything—primarily because of his reaction to that song. He’d never reacted that way to any song on the radio; wouldn’t even turn the channel when songs he didn’t particularly like came on (something I do all the time!).

    My father isn’t a swing voter. He’s a union man and a socialist, who has typically voted Democratic as the lesser of two evils since Illinois (unlike Vermont) isn’t going to back a socialist candidate. But…he’s fairly representative of men of his generation and background when it comes to his attitudes toward the South. GOP strategists recognize this, and are going to play against it by pushing Daniels—a northern son of immigrants without evangelical baggage. Someone who has already boldly named Condoleeza Rice as his potential running mate.

    Daniels and his GOP backers are already setting their plays in place. This is the real contender, folks. Forget about Romney or Huckabee.

  16. Avida Quesada
    Avida Quesada May 15, 2011 at 5:12 pm |

    “as well as requiring doctors to tell women that life begins at fertilization and that a fetus can feel pain at or before 20 weeks of pregnancy.”

    Forcing health care professionals to give politically motivated philosophical opinions will be a travesty. When people are in power they forget the effects that this kind of decisions will have when they are no longer in power. I hope this get repealed. More than nothing for the shake of women needing or wanting an abortion, but also because is an ugly prospect for all.

    Tomorrow could be other position anti religious , or agains any particular believe. Or could be the imposition of secularism.

    They are so blind in there effort to control women that they forget:Tomorrow a different political view point could be also be imposed from the Drs desk.

  17. Poeschl
    Poeschl May 15, 2011 at 7:17 pm |

    @LaLubu – “Daniels and his GOP backers are already setting their plays in place.”

    Absolutely true.

    But the very fact that GOP elites are quietly getting behind Daniels may cause him to lose the primaries. Tea Partiers will decide the 2012 GOP primaries, and to TP’ers, GOP elites are as anathema as socialists. The Tea Party movement is actually against anyone at all currently in office (whom TP’ers identify as part of the “elite”). TP’ers are also less concerned with winning elections than with modifying the political culture from below. That’s why, in Delaware in 2010, Christine O’Donnell was nominated even though she was hilariously unelectable. The TP’ers didn’t care if she won; they just wanted to make a political statement. So the fact that Mitch Daniels is a current officeholder with successful (in GOP eyes) experience as governor might turn TP’ers against him.

    Finally, even though Mitch Daniels’ non-evangelicalism might conceivably win over independents and moderates, it will not endear him to Southern Republicans, who have been the storm troopers of GOP electoral victories since 1980. The GOP has learned since 1980 that it cannot win the White House without Southern Republicans. The GOP is now shackled to the South. So, unless Mitch Daniels pledges allegiance to the Confederacy (so to speak), Southerners might torpedo his nomination.

    La Lubu’s comment accurately outlines why GOP elites favor Daniels as a nominee — he’s an experienced officeholder who so far does not identify with (white) Southern issues. But for that very reason GOP primary voters won’t support him (or so I think). I’ll bet the 2012 GOP nominee will be a non-officeholder who is an expert at holding his/her finger to the wind (but not Gingrich), and Obama will coast to reelection unless both unemployment and fuel prices are so high that any non-incumbent has a plausible chance.

  18. this n that | What's that you said?

    [...] this, give [...]

  19. By Golly
    By Golly May 16, 2011 at 7:04 pm |

    The concern isn’t stopping abortion, but stopping women from excercising agency, sexual and otherwise. Cut off birth control and you cut off the ability to plan a family and a life. *$!

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