Author: has written 5272 posts for this blog.

Jill has been blogging for Feministe since 2005.
Return to: Homepage | Blog Index

33 Responses

  1. gretel
    gretel May 31, 2011 at 9:25 am |

    Damn. I can’t make it tonight! What a good lineup! I hope someone records it.

  2. Fern
    Fern May 31, 2011 at 12:14 pm |

    We (OR Books) are going to record it! We will share when it’s ready as a file. Thanks for asking :)

    - Fern, Publicity Manager, OR Books

  3. tinfoil hattie
    tinfoil hattie May 31, 2011 at 2:54 pm |

    Rude Pundit is a misogynist. Why would anyone want to go to his event? I don’t care if he thinks it’s “funny” when he calls Ann Coulter a cunt. It’s NOT. Why does he get a pass? Because he’s so edgy and funny, using sexual references all the time, or because Ann Coulter deserves to be called a cunt?

  4. Florence
    Florence May 31, 2011 at 3:29 pm |

    Tinfoil Hattie, I’ll bite. Because he’s consistently on the side of women’s rights and feminism.

    If your primary beef with Rude Pundit’s prose is the strain of insults he uses, fine, that’s fair — but I would argue that The Shakespeare’s Sister Standard of Proper Feminist/Activist Practice doesn’t apply to most of the real world, and that’s fine too.

  5. Nahida
    Nahida May 31, 2011 at 7:53 pm |

    2 cents: A man calling a woman “cunt” is discrediting. He doesn’t get a pass just cause he’s liek so kewl with the ladiez.

  6. tinfoil hattie
    tinfoil hattie May 31, 2011 at 9:20 pm |

    Tinfoil Hattie, I’ll bite. Because he’s consistently on the side of women’s rights and feminism.

    I don’t read Shakespeare’s Sister, so I don’t get the context of your other comment. But in my world, the real world, it’s not okay to call women cunts. Would you say Lee Papa is “consistently on the side of minority rights and pro African-American” if he were to frequently say, “Reason 6263 why (conservative African American) is a n***er?”

    I bet not.

    My standards are simple. If you call women “cunts,” you are neither a feminist nor a women’s advocate. It goes against any feminist sense to say, “Stop raping and harassing and bullying and assaulting and murdering us, but that ‘cunt’ thing? It’s okay if you’re a funny liberal dude.”

  7. Marksman2010
    Marksman2010 May 31, 2011 at 9:49 pm |

    Jill, are you certain you have time for this?

    I heard Sarah Palin was in New York, and I was almost certain you’d make a mad dash to try and shake hands with her!

  8. Aletheia
    Aletheia May 31, 2011 at 10:26 pm |

    Rude Pundit is a misogynist. Why would anyone want to go to his event? I don’t care if he thinks it’s “funny” when he calls Ann Coulter a cunt. It’s NOT.

    If your primary beef with Rude Pundit’s prose is the strain of insults he uses, fine, that’s fair — but I would argue that The Shakespeare’s Sister Standard of Proper Feminist/Activist Practice doesn’t apply to most of the real world, and that’s fine too.

    Eh, I don’t know about that, Florence. It seems to me that referring to women using the c-word is quite a bit different from using the word “blind” as a synonym for “unable to see.”

  9. Florence
    Florence June 1, 2011 at 1:59 pm |

    I’m willing to overlook nasty language in order to see the larger critique. I am also willing to accept imperfect speakers in my movement. YMMV.

  10. Justine Baily
    Justine Baily June 1, 2011 at 2:56 pm |

    tinfoil hattie:
    My standards are simple.If you call women “cunts,” you are neither a feminist nor a women’s advocate.It goes against any feminist sense to say, “Stop raping and harassing and bullying and assaulting and murdering us, but that ‘cunt’ thing? It’s okay if you’re a funny liberal dude.”

    Out of mostly un-sarcastic curiosity, what word would you use to describe someone who consistently and vocally advocates for women’s rights/empowerment, reproductive freedom, and harshly attacks public figures who voice opposition to either of those two things, and yet likes calling one of the more odious conservative female pundits a c-nt?

    If misogynist is what you’re going with, well, that word doesn’t have much meaning to you anymore, does it? If you use the same word to describe someone who honestly looks at us as communal property and also someone who is more or less THE EXACT OPPOSITE of that, but likes calling names, then, well, have fun with that. I happen to think it’s a rather important word that shouldn’t be cheapened so.

  11. tinfoil hattie
    tinfoil hattie June 1, 2011 at 9:35 pm |

    Sorry, Justine. I remain firm: If you call women “cunts,” you are a misogynist. I don’t care what other great works of advocacy any mansplainer performs. If you can’t refrain from using a hateful gendered insult, you’re doing feminism wrong.

  12. tinfoil hattie
    tinfoil hattie June 2, 2011 at 4:33 am |

    Justine: Would you call a white person who consistently uses “nigger” as a “joke” a racist?

  13. Florence
    Florence June 2, 2011 at 10:27 am |

    tinfoil hattie: Justine: Would you call a white person who consistently uses “nigger” as a “joke” a racist?

    False equivalence. These words and their usage are on completely different historical and contextual planes. Would I call the endless dragging out of the n-word as an object lesson in activism racist? I could, and I have.

    I remain firm: If you call women “cunts,” you are a misogynist. I don’t care what other great works of advocacy any mansplainer performs. If you can’t refrain from using a hateful gendered insult, you’re doing feminism wrong.

    M’kay. If you’re comfortable having an insular and reductive prescriptivist movement, more power to you. But there are plenty of feminists on record celebrating and using the word in all sorts of linguistic contexts, good and bad, most famously Inga Muscio and Eve Ensler, and I’m sure they’d be interested to know they’re uninvited to all political fora for doing feminism wrong.

    Or, if your beef is that it’s a dude using the word, and that you find his “rude” schtick crass, I’d call that a taste preference and call it a day. It’s in the movement’s interest to move away from the “prescribe and boycott” model and more toward a “describe and progress” model. Enforcement of movement purity is for the ivory towers — good luck taking it to the real world.

  14. S.H.
    S.H. June 2, 2011 at 12:01 pm |

    Florence: But there are plenty of feminists on record celebrating and using the word in all sorts of linguistic contexts, good and bad, most famously Inga Muscio and Eve Ensler, and I’m sure they’d be interested to know they’re uninvited to all political fora for doing feminism wrong.

    What you’re describing, particularly with Muscio, is the effort to reclaim the word and reject its negative connotation. That’s not how the word was used with Coulter. It was used specifically FOR its negative connotation in order to smack her down.

  15. Florence
    Florence June 2, 2011 at 12:22 pm |

    S.H.: Right, but that’s not what was said. What was said is that use of that word is inherently misogynist:

    If you can’t refrain from using a hateful gendered insult, you’re doing feminism wrong.

    …and that since RP uses it (as does Muscio, Ensler, and a wide variety of e-feminists, if they’re feeling honest), that he’s Bad For Feminism no matter his deeds or the root of the beliefs he espouses, that No True Feminist would be interested in seeing a Real Misogynist speak or help him promote his goods because anyone who uses the world shouldn’t “get a pass”, and the ouroboros eats itself, the internet blows up, forever, Amen.

    I’m arguing that that’s reductive and a whatever analysis, especially since purification goals set the bar too high for regular ol’ interested and engaged human beings who aren’t up to date on the latest feminist-blogosphere-rhetoric to meet.

  16. S.H.
    S.H. June 2, 2011 at 2:02 pm |

    Florence I think the word insult is key here. Saying Ann Coulter is a cunt and I hate her for it is profoundly different from saying “I’m a cunt and proud of it”. I’m not speaking for anyone but myself, but I just can’t be cool with using misogynistic slurs to cut her down even when I can’t stand her either.

    Regarding language and purification, I think your argument is similar to Sady’s recent argument that having very specific guidelines for language can alienate people who are new to the movement, which I think is a really good point. But I also get a little uncomfortable with phrases like “real world” and “regular human beings” which are at their core meaningless given the diversity of people and their “worlds”, and tend to erase people’s experiences.

    But back to the word choice issue with Coulter, it also gets into a slippery slope if cunt is kosher to use when we don’t like the person, and ya know some girls do dress like sluts, and ya know how some of those bitches lie. We start making exceptions for specific people we find loathesome and fail to protect them from misogyny, the whole battle against misogyny becomes useless. It just kind has that smell of “I’m not sexist, but…”

    In a non-internet example, I remember in 2010 CA Gov campaign, someone from Jerry Brown’s camp called Meg Whitman a political whore, and Jerry didn’t exactly rush to clean it up. Now I love, LOVE Mr. Brown, he was my first political crush, but ever since that moment, I have to admit I just don’t feel the same way anymore. I don’t discount all the work he’s done, but I can’t let that moment go so easily either.

    I don’t think it makes him, or Rude Pundit, a bad feminist forever. People fuck up, I do it alot and I don’t have the pressure of running a blog and my words being parsed constantly. But I think using gendered insults to attack women is an issue that has to be more fully explored, words do have meaning and they can cause damage, often to more people than the intended target. I do agree we can be in danger of setting the bar too high, but I’m also worried about setting it too low.

  17. Florence
    Florence June 2, 2011 at 4:08 pm |

    S.H.: In a non-internet example, I remember in 2010 CA Gov campaign, someone from Jerry Brown’s camp called Meg Whitman a political whore, and Jerry didn’t exactly rush to clean it up. Now I love, LOVE Mr. Brown, he was my first political crush, but ever since that moment, I have to admit I just don’t feel the same way anymore. I don’t discount all the work he’s done, but I can’t let that moment go so easily either.

    I don’t think it makes him, or Rude Pundit, a bad feminist forever. People fuck up, I do it alot and I don’t have the pressure of running a blog and my words being parsed constantly. But I think using gendered insults to attack women is an issue that has to be more fully explored, words do have meaning and they can cause damage, often to more people than the intended target. I do agree we can be in danger of setting the bar too high, but I’m also worried about setting it too low.

    I actually think we’re speaking the same language here. My question is why we accept a prescriptivist over descriptivist goals in regards to social justice and language when we know it’s a losing battle. The trend online is to target “bad” language, isolate the word from all non-”bad” context, and isolate and boycott the speaker that used it. This is a poor approach, IMO.

    Great example with the Jerry Brown anecdote — I personally think that the linguistic history and usage of “whore” makes it amenable to a variety of contexts (none of which preclude the rights of women as a class or the rights of sex workers in particular). Another public comparison is “political whore” vs. “nappy headed hoes” — where Brown’s “whore”‘s relationship to women as a class is much more esoteric than the “hoes” insult, which was race, class, and heavily gender based. Also wasn’t a fan of Obama’s “lipstick on a pig” analogies (and the “99 Problems” fumble), which were clearly intended to undercut Palin’s image during the last presidential campaign.

    But tsking at that kind of language is one thing. Or recognizing that this kind of language dampers my enthusiasm for a public figure, or puts a bad taste in my mouth, or inspires an angry, exasperated blog post, or weighing how it affects my mental health. Asking “Why would anyone ever want to attend this event with this misogynist?” is another. And my answer is still valid: Because RP is consistently on the side of women’s rights and feminism. Yep, he sure called Ann Coulter a cunt. Multiple times, I’m sure, but I’m not googling it at work. We can argue whether this is feminist or pro-woman, or rhetorically undesirable, and we can argue whether it’s okay to let conservatives adopt the harshest political invective while we liberal pinkos try to play nice, blah blah blah, rinse, repeat. RP is still advocates for the structural adoption of women’s rights, period. That and he invited a couple of smart, interesting women to talk about their political awakenings, so that might convince a few people to go. I’d go.

  18. S.H.
    S.H. June 2, 2011 at 5:47 pm |

    Florence: My question is why we accept a prescriptivist over descriptivist goals in regards to social justice and language when we know it’s a losing battle. The trend online is to target “bad” language, isolate the word from all non-”bad” context, and isolate and boycott the speaker that used it. This is a poor approach, IMO.

    For the record, I’m not suggesting people should boycott Rude Pundit or (or anyone who associates with him). But I also don’t think people who do feel that the language is a dealbreaker for them should be stigmatized as not living in the real world, etc as was suggested earlier.

    I’m not sure there is a right or wrong approach. I’ve been trying to be very careful to stay on the subject of the word, rather than to judge Rude Pundit or his blog as a whole, because a) I’m not familiar enough to judge him/it as a whole and b) this isn’t the place to shit on someone else’s blog and I try not to do that because blogging involves alot of hard stuff that I can barely master enough to just comment without it looking like gobbledygook.

    I Stand by the fact that I can’t be down with cunt in that context, it’s just my breaking point, but I still respect those who feel differently about it. Guess that’s the best I can do.

  19. tinfoil hattie
    tinfoil hattie June 3, 2011 at 12:32 am |

    The misogyny apology in this thread is laughable.

    These words and their usage are on completely different historical and contextual planes.

    You’re kidding, right? Seriously. You don’t really believe this? CUNT is about the worst slur a man can throw at a woman. How bad does a word have to be before it’s inexcusable?

    Why do so many women here excuse the bad behavior of their dudebros? What is so all-fired important and great about Lee Papa that you have to defend him, on a FEMINIST website, for calling women CUNTS? Because hey, he’s funny! And totes on our side! Except for the calling women CUNTS thing!

    If he made similar slurs about transfolk, or gays, or disabled people, or – dare I say it – religion, you would be all over him. But women? On a feminist website? Come on, tinfoil hattie. Get your feminist priorities straight, and live in the “real” world! Where misogyny is funny! And we let our dudebuds say horrible things about women so they’ll know we are the cool kinds of feminists, not those humorless ones who insist that the word “cunt,” used against women, is a form of violence.

    How do you justify this? Seriously.

  20. Lurker Lyn
    Lurker Lyn June 3, 2011 at 7:18 am |

    The dude doesn’t get a pass just because he does good things. If he’s really a good guy underneath it all he’ll be open to criticism, and if he’s a really frickin’ amazing guy he might even do something about it. Saying it’s his style doesn’t give him a pass. What if a comedian made a ton of money selling out shows primarily based on rape jokes, and donated all his fees to rape crisis centers? Would that make the jokes OK?

  21. Florence
    Florence June 3, 2011 at 8:06 am |

    tinfoil hattie:
    These words and their usage are on completely different historical and contextual planes.

    You’re kidding, right? Seriously. You don’t really believe this?

    I do believe this. One word was systemically applied to a group of people in order to dehumanize them as they were systematically shipped around the world and bought and sold as human chattel. The other word is a bad word people call women and has no systematic historical context other than being a really bad word people call women.

    Is it gendered? Yep. Is it sexist? Yep. Is it cringe-inducing? Yep. Is it funny? No, it’s actually really tired. Is it enough to organize a boycott around? God, I hope not.

    This online feminist defense of Ann Coulter has almost turned into a matter of principle. I get why, and yes, it’s important to make distinctions about the language we use and why, but remember that Ann Coulter made a career advocating for the public flogging of black children, gleefully saying that the prison rape of criminals is an expected and hoped for part of their sentence, suggesting that the 9/11 victims deserved what they got, and that the best way to talk to liberals is “with a baseball bat”. If we want to talk about rhetorical forms of violence, especially those excused as “just a joke”, Coulter is a really, really good place to begin.

    Does that excuse calling her a “cunt”? No, but I sure as hell aren’t going to waste my time organizing around it.

    If he made similar slurs about transfolk, or gays, or disabled people, or – dare I say it – religion, you would be all over him.

    No, sorry, you’re actually talking to someone who thinks language policing is old news, tiresome work, and fruitless anyway, hence our entire disagreement. You can keep trying to chalk it up to some dudebro apologist ladies trying to shimmy up to the shining glory of a fucking BLOGGER, or you can take what I said at face value (none of which includes condoning of the word’s use) and talk yourself off the ceiling. Your call.

    S.H.: But I also don’t think people who do feel that the language is a dealbreaker for them should be stigmatized as not living in the real world, etc as was suggested earlier.

    You’re right, I misspoke. I’m coming from the place where all these discussions about correct feminist language are not only extremely alienating to new feminists, but also extremely confusing to those of us who live with, work with, and love people whose political beliefs are very different from our own (most of us?), people who don’t accept (or are aware of) the premises of our insular online discussions about correct language, or understand the anger kabuki dance we all do online when our collective, always evolving language policies are offended.

    So RE: “real world”: What do you do when your dad (or mom, or boss, or whoever) says something misogynist? Well, what are my goals? Do I want to be able to talk to them tomorrow? Work with them? Continue our co-operational relationship? Or do I want to win the invective contest and really grind Mom/Dad/Boss/Whoever into the dirt? I personally do what I can to move through it, make my point clear, set boundaries, and find a way to continue to coexist and work together. I try to model the conversations I want to have. Why the hell would my approach be any different online?

  22. S.H.
    S.H. June 3, 2011 at 12:53 pm |

    Jill: What Florence and I have said is that he doesn’t deserve a boycott, and that maybe there are better targets at which to direct our limited energies.

    Okay this popped into my head right away…what about Slut Walk? I know the entire protest isn’t just about the word slut, but don’t you think the word itself was a bit of a flashpoint? That’s why I feel cunt, slut, whore, aren’t just words when they’re used in a certain way, they’re weapons. They hold power and it’s alot more than rude. Walking up to someone and stabbing them in the eye would technically be considered rude too, but that’s the least of it.

    I’m sorry if I’m getting repetitive but I’m uncomfortable with someone identifying as a women’s rights activist and having that weapon in their back pocket to nail someone with, knowing full well it only works because of the gender of the target. It’s almost like cheating, for lack of a better word. I guess I’ve been burned alot, particularly online, by a lot of liberals (mostly dudes) who claim to be for women’s rights, but out of the blue throw out some misogynist whopper. It’s just like a gutpunch.

    But also realize that different people have their own breaking points, cunt to me is like a punch, but for others it can be the word bitch. I use bitch all the time and I know I shouldn’t but the damn thing is so versatile, its a verb, adjective, and noun! Someone can easily call me out on that and it would be valid, but I do try not to use it with the sole purpose of cutting a woman down to size, which I still feel was the intent in the Ann Coulter example.

    Also, full disclosure, I don’t remember this original controversy, the first time I heard about it was on Tuesday when it was mentioned in comments, so I’m not trying to dredge up old shit for kicks here. I’m trying to work this all out in my head more than anything else. These issues aren’t easy, but it seems like incidents like the Coulter one happen over and over and that’s why I’m like AARRGGHH! But the ARRGGH! isn’t being directed at Jill or Florence, and I’m not judging anyone’s feminist creds here, I just want to be absolutely clear on that.

  23. Florence
    Florence June 3, 2011 at 2:14 pm |

    I actually haven’t been following the Slutwalk controversy at all so I can’t really speak to it. I will say that I personally find the use of “slut/whore” less problematic than many feminists, I imagine, but I came up during the days of feminist language reclamation when “slut” and “whore” were public badges of sexually active, don’t-give-a-fuck, I’ll-get-mine women. Which was how I was perceiving the use of “slut” in Slutwalk. Sounds like I’m wrong. Maybe I should dive in.

    But personally, we need to be careful when we talk about “violence”. Language certainly creates an atmosphere where actual violence is more acceptable against certain peoples, which is why I think we need to be careful not to be hyperbolic about it. (The only reading I’ve done on Slutwalk is on Twitter, where I’m watching a group of self-styled anarcho-feminists call a male feminist leader a rapist, literally, for helping organize Slutwalk LA. The guy is a lot of things, but he’s not a rapist. When called on it, the anarcho-feminists have decided that he might as well be a rapist, so, onwards! Posthaste! Rapist, it is! Which, for all the glee, because it’s *only* the internet, is actually pretty harmful.) (Eventually I’ll come up with a non-dude-centered example.)

    Anyway, I get what you’re saying about dudes keeping certain words in the back pocket, as it were, and I don’t have a good answer to that. In my world, I don’t have a choice whether or not to work with people who use gender-based invective. They all do. The choices I have are whether or not their offers for cooperative work are beneficial to me or my goals (for example, is it beneficial to Jill or Sadie specifically or feminism generally to participate in Lee Pappas’ event? Arguably, yes.). I’ve gotten involved with so-called radicals whose sexism and racism was so deep that and benefit I could have gleaned for my own goals was outweighed by the personal disappointment I felt in associating with them. Other people consider this opportunism selling out, but I don’t think we get anywhere arguing on how better to purify the movement.

    I don’t know. I’m old and business-minded. Movement visibility and efficacy are the goals here, and there’s no shame in self-promotion, up-and-coming ladies. It’s not selling out to take advantage of opportunities that fall in your lap, especially if it promotes the expansion of equality for you and yours. Lee Pappas is a conduit for reaching those goals. I say use those conduits if it’s beneficial. Who cares about the host.

  24. S.H.
    S.H. June 3, 2011 at 3:23 pm |

    Florence: I actually haven’t been following the Slutwalk controversy at all so I can’t really speak to it.

    Sorry, I probrably should’ve been more clear with that example. Slutwalk started because during a public safety forum a police officer in Canada claimed women wouldn’t get raped if they didn’t dress like sluts. Alot of women got really pissed and started slutwalk in protest. That’s why I used the example because slut wasn’t just used to be rude and people found that word to be such a lightning rod they were moved to action.

    Florence: But personally, we need to be careful when we talk about “violence”. Language certainly creates an atmosphere where actual violence is more acceptable against certain peoples, which is why I think we need to be careful not to be hyperbolic about it

    Wait did you not tell me 18 times that language policing is wrong and you’re telling me now to be careful with my language? Putting that irony aside for a second, most domestic violence advocates recognize verbal abuse as a part of the cycle of violence, and most if not all recognize sexism as a source of domestic violence. Not to say it is the sole cause but rather it fosters an environment wherein one gender feels entititlement over the other and men thus feel entitled to use harm against women. They’re not separate issues and I’m certainly not being hyperbolic by claiming there is a correlation between sexism and gendered violence. Activists such as Tony Porter and Ted Bunch are working to stamp out sexism in an effort to eradicate gendered violence. Violence is a choice one makes, but its facilitated largely by a sexist system wherein women routinely are referred to as cunts and sluts.

  25. Florence
    Florence June 3, 2011 at 3:43 pm |

    Wait did you not tell me 18 times that language policing is wrong and you’re telling me now to be careful with my language?

    I was speaking specifically to tinfoil hattie’s assertion that we are excusing violence because we disagree with her premise that one particular word is always unforgivable period, which I think is rhetorically effective thanks to the pathos, but otherwise kind of hyperbolic. Personally, as feminists speaking about language, we do need to be careful about the hyperbole because we tend to eat one another over relatively small or negligible disagreements, especially regarding acceptable language, yes.

  26. S.H.
    S.H. June 3, 2011 at 4:25 pm |

    Florence: I was speaking specifically to tinfoil hattie’s assertion that we are excusing violence because we disagree with her premise that one particular word is always unforgivable period

    whoops, I thought the whole thing was directed at me because of my stabbing someone in the eye analogy. Sorry for the confusion!

  27. tinfoil hattie
    tinfoil hattie June 3, 2011 at 8:42 pm |

    “Cunt” is an age-old, historical slur used to oppress half the human race. Your willful ignorance is astonishing.

    You know I’m right. You just can’t admit it, because that will make you question your beliefs in places that make it really uncomfortable.

    “It’s not such a bad word” is a really weak defense. It IS a bad word. A violent, misogynist word that Lee Papa uses to get laughs from dudebros and their pals. Truth hurts.

  28. tinfoil hattie
    tinfoil hattie June 3, 2011 at 8:46 pm |

    Associating with RP doesn’t make anyone a “bad” feminist. It makes one a weak feminist. One who won’t stand up to dudebros, because they’re so gosh-darn funny!

    If you can’t see the historic and violent context a man calling a woman he doesn’t like a “cunt,” I am at a loss. Yes, it has been used throughout history to damage and harm half the population. Half. As a feminist with firm convictions, I’m not okay with some dude contributing to this violence, no matter how funny he is. Why does feminism have to excuse behavior no other movement will tolerate?

  29. Justine Bailey
    Justine Bailey June 4, 2011 at 2:14 pm |

    tinfoil hattie:
    Associating with RP doesn’t make anyone a “bad” feminist.It makes one a weak feminist.One who won’t stand up to dudebros, because they’re so gosh-darn funny!

    If you can’t see the historic and violent context a man calling a woman he doesn’t like a “cunt,” I am at a loss.Yes, it has been used throughout history to damage and harm half the population.Half.As a feminist with firm convictions, I’m not okay with some dude contributing to this violence, no matter how funny he is.Why does feminism have to excuse behavior no other movement will tolerate?

    Thank you for the lesson in REAL feminism. Maybe one day we can all be strong feminists like you, and not weak ones like Jill. Thank you for taking such a principled, courageous stand on this message board, and thank you also for telling us what we know.

  30. Lee Papa
    Lee Papa June 5, 2011 at 10:06 pm |

    Yes, words have power, some more than others. I take none of the words I use lightly, nor do I ever write something insulting solely for the joke of it. When I use the word “cunt,” unless I’m referring specifically to genitalia, I’m doing so because of the provocation factor, because of its power to upset people. I’ve used it for men, too (Colin Powell, Rudy Giuliani, and George W. Bush, off the top of my head), but I know that gendered context is everything. When it comes to using it to insult women, I’ve reserved it for Ann Coulter. Why? Because she has degraded women and men in the most ruthless, disgusting ways she can. And one way to call attention to that is to reflect it in as blatant a way as possible.

    You can disagree with that as bullshit justification. But I wanted to make clear that I never write anything because I think “dudebros” (great term) will laugh at it. Fuck those guys.

    Sorry to be late to the conversation. And mucho thanks and respect to Feministe and to Jill (again).

  31. Anne-Claire
    Anne-Claire June 8, 2011 at 7:18 am |

    Hello Jill,
    I am a french journalist, working in Paris, and I want to interview you. I am currently writing an article about the US feminist perception of the Strauss-Kahn Case, and I am very interested by your point of view.
    Contact me at: ac.ducoudray@gmail.com
    Thank you very much.
    Anne-Claire

Comments are closed.

The commenting period has expired for this post. If you wish to re-open the discussion, please do so in the latest Open Thread.