Thursday, NYC: Anew School Fundraiser

If you’re in New York this Thursday, March 8th, I hope you’ll join me at a fundraiser for Anew School, which has a mission “to provide unprecedented academic, emotional/mental health, and social training to “at-risk” African-American seventh and eighth grade youth in a school in Ghana.” It’ll be a fun night for a great cause. (Full disclosure: The Founder and President of Anew School is a friend of mine, and their Secretary has guest-blogged here at Feministe).

Here are the event details:

THE GROUNDBREAKING: The Anew School Fundraiser Party
Thursday, March 8, 2012
6 to 10 p.m.
@ Greenhouse, 150 Varick Street
Suggested Donation of $25

4 comments for “Thursday, NYC: Anew School Fundraiser

  1. March 5, 2012 at 6:34 pm

    “at-risk”? Like, for crime and stuff?

    Also, is this for black kids in the US (“African-American”) who get to go to a school in Ghana? Or is it for black kids who already live in Ghana?

    • March 5, 2012 at 6:44 pm

      Also, is this for black kids in the US (“African-American”) who get to go to a school in Ghana? Or is it for black kids who already live in Ghana?

      It’s for black kids in the U.S. who get to go to a school in Ghana.

  2. March 5, 2012 at 11:19 pm

    Not sure the color of the kids matters, but I’d like to offer our first aid fundraising program for future you if you still need funds after this weekend’s fundraiser.

    The students could actually bring first aid with them to Ghana, along with having used it to raise money.

    Hope to help,

    Michael

  3. number9
    March 6, 2012 at 10:58 am

    Xeginy, “at-risk” has traditionally meant “youth who are not likely to graduate from high school.” A lot of people use it as a catch-all term, either because they’re trying to express that the young person is at-risk for negative things being done to them (e.g. saying that some youth are at-risk of being victims of violent crime) or doing negative things themselves (e.g. saying that some youth are at-risk for committing crime).

    So the term “at-risk” has come to carry negative connotations, because people who are not in the field of youth development typically use it in the second way, to describe negative behaviors that youth are supposedly “at-risk” of performing. A lot of us who are in the field of youth development are moving away from using it for that reason. Educators tend to still use it, because it works for them. Not a fan of it, personally, or any other ways of labeling youth.

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