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  1. Jordan S
    Jordan S March 30, 2012 at 6:14 pm |

    (I’m male)

    A quick note about being bustifully beautiful and glowing in the furtive, appreciative glances of men: Live it up, because they’re just going to call you a slut as soon as you don’t put out. Or worse. Foundation undergarments giveth, and foundation undergarments taketh away.

    Actually, Im more likely to be the opposite. I don’t really want to see ANYONE walk around in their underwear. And I don’t think that people should think they have to to be appreciated.

    If you feel sexier or more confident in a low-cut top, good on you, but women without breasts are no less powerful, strong, beautiful, or womanly than those with cleavage to flash.

    To anyone lacking confidence: I prefer them smaller anyway(not to sound inappropriate or anything, but I think its a preference that’s often forgotten amid all the advertisements).

  2. Doris Mirando-Jelinek
    Doris Mirando-Jelinek March 30, 2012 at 6:57 pm |

    Thank you for your take on this…..I think cleavage is so beautiful and feminine, but as a breast cancer survivor, I don’t have any anymore. Thank you for pointing out that we are more than our breasts. That we can still be beautiful, strong, feminine and matter. :)

  3. maggiemay
    maggiemay March 30, 2012 at 7:07 pm |

    great post—laugh-out-loud funny

  4. Past my expiration date
    Past my expiration date March 30, 2012 at 7:15 pm |

    If you want to celebrate women, celebrate women, and if you want to celebrate boobs, celebrate boobs

    Now I’m singing Cat Stevens.

  5. umami
    umami March 30, 2012 at 7:16 pm |

    ack, I worry about cleavage at work all the time. I don’t work somewhere with a strict dress code, but my body type is just very prone to looking inappropriate if you give it the least bit of leeway. I was OK during the winter, but now I can’t wear wool jumpers any more, it’s just stressful finding work-y outfits that don’t show cleavage. Really I would prefer something that shows absolutely not even a hint of uncovered boobage but I have to settle for just trying to minimise it. Even camis show a bit, maybe I haven’t found the right place to buy them?Just… ugh. I hate having to spend this amount of time thinking about clothes. I had never heard of National Cleavage Day till I read this post, but I hate it with a passion.

  6. marle
    marle March 30, 2012 at 7:33 pm |

    How is the first post here some dude giving his opinion on boobs?

  7. redcat
    redcat March 30, 2012 at 7:34 pm |

    I struggled through adolescence feeling like I wasn’t “female enough” because I never had to deal with hiding and/or showing off cleavage. Now, as a woman who still can’t wear bras because they don’t make a cup size small enough, I’d say celebrating cleavage as synonymous to femininity is a slap in the face to a lot of actual women.

  8. Jadey
    Jadey March 30, 2012 at 7:45 pm |

    How is the first post here some dude giving his opinion on boobs?

    Isn’t that our number one concern? I could have sworn that’s, like, line one in my pamphlet, “How to Be a Modern Woman” I received when I was 14. “1. When in doubt, ask a dude!”

    Tip: My confidence is not directly proportional to what you desire. What guys think is sexy is the cause of at least as many problems as it’s the solution to.

    Caperton: Right. On.

  9. ks
    ks March 30, 2012 at 7:52 pm |

    I never used to have them at all (and I mean, at all–I was almost completely flat), but the one good, lasting thing that pregnancy did to my body was give me a fantastic rack (it certainly wasn’t the giant ass or the sciatica or the peeing every time I sneeze), so these days I will go out of my way to show them off on a pretty regular basis. Seems silly to only devote one day a year to it when for me, most every day is Cleavage Day.

    But to think that my rack is what makes me a woman, or strong, or intelligent, or powerful, or any of that is just plain silly. The one has nothing to do with the other.

  10. Jordan S
    Jordan S March 30, 2012 at 8:31 pm |

    In no way was I trying to make a decision for you.
    Certainly not saying my opinion is the only one that matters. I don’t even feel qualified to give an opinion.
    Just trying to offer something, hopefully helpful. I only brought it up because it seemed to be a concern to caperton at the end, that society views the lack of breasts as bad, and women may lack confidence because of it.

    Going to run to a corner and die of embarrassment now.

  11. Angie unduplicated
    Angie unduplicated March 30, 2012 at 8:59 pm |

    The enormous amount of attention given to breast cancer always looked just too much like tits are the only part of us that matter to anyone. Women do get cancer in other parts of our bodies, but media ignore that rough fact. We’re still defined by our bras.

    I was an Itty-Bitty Titty Committee member until my thirties, when raging hormones became a blessing instead of unmitigated curse. Cleavage-friendly bras, though, have been sent to the woodstove, replaced by camis or by cotton exercise bras.

  12. Jordan S
    Jordan S March 30, 2012 at 9:51 pm |

    Appreciate that feedback caperton. I don’t have these views (of them being attached to the value of women) and don’t suffer from them, so its a bit hard for me to pick them out.

    I offered my comment from that perspective, because if a woman was suffering or had low self-confidence as a result of it, I thought it would reach better if I offered from that perspective, and provided another which they could view from.

    I was actually embarrassed my statement was misinterpreted..and I don’t usually talk about this – and I have low self confidence.

  13. Donald B.
    Donald B. March 30, 2012 at 9:57 pm |

    I only ended up here because a friend posted a notification of the “holiday” via foursquare. If I could, my comment would simply be an oversized question mark. I think that way too much focus is given to the effort of being sexy. There actually isn’t much that is necessary for a man and woman to eventually reach such a place.

    My number one beef is that it seems like is advertised but, often discouraged to seek. I place the clothing with words across carry the same effect when someone is caught “reading”.

    *sigh*

  14. Jordan S
    Jordan S March 30, 2012 at 10:02 pm |

    I think there’s a fine line between reading a shirt (which can be done at a glance) and just plain staring. Are you saying that if a woman wears a shirt with writing on it she is automatically giving the OK to stare?

  15. Kordo
    Kordo March 31, 2012 at 1:34 am |

    This is why I read Feministe; a different perspective. I confess I’d have fallen into the same mental trap Jordan did, and noted that “I like all kinds of boobs so don’t stress, ladies!” without thinking about how I’d feel if I was being constantly rated based on the size of my dick or some other physical attribute. Even (especially?) if I had John Holmes-level gear, I think that would get kinda tiresome within about a week. The idea of living in a society built around such a rating system is alien to me, & I never would have thought about it unless I stumbled into a discussion like this one.

    This is couched in Comedy, but it’s also scarily true->

    http://www.cracked.com/article_19785_5-ways-modern-men-are-trained-to-hate-women.html

    I vote for Universal Nudism, Free Love, & Death to Whomever Publishes Cosmopolitan Magazine.

  16. Jordan S
    Jordan S March 31, 2012 at 1:54 am |

    That’s kind of a horrible way to phrase it. It makes me feel worse.

    But again, I didn’t mean it in that sense. Actually, this is probably the first discussion I’ve ever had about breasts.

    I don’t rate people on physical properties. And it absolutely annoys me when people judge me by my physical properties, which is probably how I ended up here.

    I believe the point I was trying to make could better be summed up as speaking against the stereotype of the “ideal” man and woman, and what their roles should be that have become ingrained in society.

  17. Kordo
    Kordo March 31, 2012 at 2:05 am |

    Wow, I think Amanda disagrees with me (and Dave Wong). I hafta disagree with Amanda on this one, I think she’s reading some of her own stuff into the article:

    “This is why liberal dudes were licking it up, since it was a purportedly anti-sexist piece, but it still had a soothing message that men still somehow are more than women, because they are more alive, you know. They have more desire. They really like sex, in a way that you women can never understand…This article, while well-meaning, couldn’t get past the notion that women are dull, because we don’t have those all-important sex drives to create sharpness and ambition.”

    Wow, I didn’t get that at all. Am I missing something here? I’ve read the article in question several times, and nowhere did I find this:

    “Wong means well, but he’s letting men off the hook. By making misogyny about men’s supposedly overpowering sex drive, he makes it seem primal and nearly unavoidable. After all, if nature dictates that men want it and women don’t, then there’s not much you can do about it. “

    Overpowering? No; just as omnipresent as yours. Wong’s point was, I believe, that males have been conditioned differently than females in our society and that that is a bad thing. I don’t recall reading anything about females being “asexual” “unartistic” or “unambitious”. Amanda notes this, in fact:

    “More importantly, men get to feel hornier because they’re socially supported in this.”

    This part is dead-on, though->

    “..I think misogyny is rooted in something else…it’s about the will to dominate…It’s because they feel entitled to have women in a submissive position to them.”

    Long story short, I don’t entirely agree with Amanda’s conclusions , but I highly recommend her article. Even a website about silly lists and dick jokes can be instructive if you turn a really sharp brain loose on it.
    To answer your question, Marle, about why a guy was the 1st commenter on a Feminist website: because it’s a good one.

  18. Androgynous for this post
    Androgynous for this post March 31, 2012 at 2:25 am |

    Stop takin’ over this thread, guys.

  19. Kordo
    Kordo March 31, 2012 at 2:42 am |

    Sorry, Jordan, didn’t mean to make you feel worse :( I think about breasts quite a bit, myself. I never gave much thought to misogyny until I started reading ‘sites like Pandagon and Echidne and Feministe. Now I see it’s a rather deeper subject than I first thought. Seems worth learning about, especially since the modern GOP seems determined to build a Bridge to the 16th Century.

    I still like boob pics and fart jokes, though.

  20. Kristen J.
    Kristen J. March 31, 2012 at 2:57 am |

    How about next year in honor of this holiday we rent a giant billboard that says: “Stop fetishizing breasts, you asshats”?

    Sure, it won’t work, but we could just point to the sign whenever someone comes out with yet another Amazing Product to make our breasts more socially approved or more Insightful Commentary about breasts and womanhood. It would save quite a bit of labor. And I would get to call lots of people who are asshats, “asshats.” Win=Win.

  21. Mercy
    Mercy March 31, 2012 at 6:26 am |

    It’s slightly unsurprising that a thread about boobs has turned into a discussion of men patting each other and themselves on the back for being so progressive, mansplaining to Marcotte (mind you, it’s “Amanda” but “Dave Wong”, because we feminists are all so chummy), and amazed at how “deep” misogyny is, but, you know, boob pics and fart jokes! I feel like we’re a post away from a “what about teh menz” statement. But, you know, it’s ok, because all the men here show us that the site is “a good one.” The men approve of small boobs AND this site. It’s so generous, really.

  22. Faithless
    Faithless March 31, 2012 at 6:48 am |

    @Kordo

    Overpowering? No; just as omnipresent as yours. Wong’s point was, I believe, that males have been conditioned differently than females in our society and that that is a bad thing. I don’t recall reading anything about females being “asexual” “unartistic” or “unambitious”

    Me either, tho as somebody who dosen’t approach women the whole cultural standard of men “hunting” is a tough one to shake. I gotta admit I’m often guilty of the “thinking men don’t get hit on” trope and typically have to remind myself that women DO want “it” and it’s not men that don’t get hit on, it’s ME who dosen’t

    I suppose its the same dilemma non stereotypically “beautiful” women go through.

  23. Amanda Marcotte
    Amanda Marcotte March 31, 2012 at 8:49 am |

    Women with big breasts are already reduced to their breasts routinely. I’m pretty flat-chested and I’ve noticed in substantive ways how it’s actually an unearned privilege, because of underlying social stereotypes that suggest the less-endowed are smarter, etc. (“Mad Men” has done some interesting stuff satirizing that stereotype.) Creating a day for people to pat themselves on the back for the piss-poor way they treat women with large breasts is just, well, ick.

  24. Amanda Marcotte
    Amanda Marcotte March 31, 2012 at 9:01 am |

    I’ll add that knowing that some random dude on the internets will deign to have sex with someone despite their supposedly horrible booblessness doesn’t actually do anything for my self-esteem, nor do I imagine that of any other flat-chested women. Men really need to think before they assume that simply by virtue of having a dick that gets hard, they’re handing out gold medals.

  25. Jadey
    Jadey March 31, 2012 at 10:04 am |

    Guys who want to be allies: *This* is one of those key moments of shutting up and listening, not being defensive. ‘Cause Jordan and Kordo at least have demonstrated that they don’t know nearly as much as they would like to think they do. That they aren’t aware of how obvious this is from their comments is kind of case in point.

    Here’s a tip: right now you are just getting started figuring this stuff out. This is one of the times when you will be most tempted to gravitate toward explanations and arguments which you feel are sufficiently progressive but are still comfortable and make sense to you. This is a trap because you are still wrapped up in all of the cosy expectations and assumptions that come along with having be trained that your way is innately superior already (said not as a woman, but as a white person, for one, who’s been spending a long time and is still working on unlearning white privilege). Seek out the explanations that make you *uncomfortable* and people who disagree with you. When discussing identity politics, although not every member of a marginalized group will agree with each other (and that’s okay), seriously avoid prioritizing the perspective of a member of a dominating group over that of a marginalized one. Neutrality is a sham – perspective matters. When you do feel comfortable, then use a working assumption that you are wrong and re-examine your assumptions (not because you necessarily always will be, but because it is easier to take a self-critical approach from this perspective than the alternative). Disconnect your self-esteem from this assumption or else you will only succeed in making every discussion about you and your feelings – this is the last thing that should ever happen. Learn to process your emotions on your own time within your own support system and do not require other people on the Internet to process them for you. Intentionality rarely matters – action and outcome do. Remember that every time someone argues or discusses this with you, they are spending their time and energy on you – don’t demand it and don’t waste it. None of this is easy. It was never supposed to be. If you’re committed, that’s great, but be intrinsically motivated and don’t wait for us to hand out cookies, as that really defeats the purpose.

    I am making this comment as an investment in future savings on acetaminophen for all the times I hopefully won’t be banging my head against a wall about a comment thread.

  26. anna
    anna March 31, 2012 at 10:09 am |

    Where is my pecs appreciation day? Time to go shirtless for women’s ogling pleasure, hot guys, and time to feel like shit for not measuring up, guys without great pecs and washboard abs. It’s only fair. Then you can feel powerful and appreciated just like us women.

  27. DoublyLinkedLists
    DoublyLinkedLists March 31, 2012 at 10:21 am |

    I came here expecting to read a funny and spot-on critique of Cleavage Day. And I did! Because Caperton wrote a smart and funny article. Was it revolutionary? Not really, but we all knew that going in right?

    But then these dudes come along, and their minds are blown!

    “What’s that you say? People JUDGE women? Based on their BREASTS?!”

    In all their time reading their cache of feminist websites, learning the “depths” of misogyny (and boobs), they could not fathom that society would be so harsh as to judge women on a physical characteristic!

    It’s all so confusing to Jordan, Donald B.. and Kordo. Jordan has never had a conversation about boobs before you guys!

    Donald B. is only here because of a friend on foursquare, probably didn’t read the article, but just wanted to let us know:

    Have you noticed that sometimes women are NOT covering up their cleavage, but then act all offended when he stares at their boobs?

    Donald has noticed this. Donald is concerned. Maybe we should all talk about it?

    Kordo is more advanced than the other two though. Kordo reads many feminist websites (and is probably annoying on all of them!) and he thinks this feminist stuff might be worth learning about a bit. He thinks about boobs a lot, but has only recently been starting to think about misogyny as well.

    His mind was blown by this article because it is the intersection of two things that he thinks about! Because of all his feminist reading, he knows that this is called “intersectionality”.

    Seriously though, I was not expecting this much confusion after reading the article.

  28. Kordo
    Kordo March 31, 2012 at 11:29 am |

    You know that feeling you get, right after you discover you’ve put your foot in your mouth? Yeah, me too.

    Jadey: noted. thanks :)

    Shuttin’ up, and listening now…

  29. Amanda Marcotte
    Amanda Marcotte March 31, 2012 at 11:51 am |

    DoublyLinked, would it be objectifying to say I want to make out with you?

  30. Sara
    Sara March 31, 2012 at 12:22 pm |

    Jill -

    Just don’t try to couch it in any of this crap about power, or strength, or beauty, or–dear God–womanhood. Those things don’t come from your breasts–they are personal, not anatomical, qualities. If you feel sexier or more confident in a low-cut top, good on you, but women without breasts are no less powerful, strong, beautiful, or womanly than those with cleavage to flash.

    - and redcat -

    I’d say celebrating cleavage as synonymous to femininity is a slap in the face to a lot of actual women.

    - just about summed it up.

  31. DoublyLinkedLists
    DoublyLinkedLists March 31, 2012 at 1:47 pm |

    I don’t think so. I think that might be humanizing in this context.

  32. alexandra
    alexandra March 31, 2012 at 2:50 pm |

    commentary amongst the readers aside, this is to you, ms. caperton: bra. va.

  33. Jordan S
    Jordan S March 31, 2012 at 4:19 pm |

    You know that feeling you get, right after you discover you’ve put your foot in your mouth? Yeah, me too.

    Jadey: noted. thanks :)

    Shuttin’ up, and listening now…

    Been there since post one.

  34. Fat Steve
    Fat Steve March 31, 2012 at 9:37 pm |

    Is this really a thing? I guess I missed it. I would have happily gone without a belt, exposing ample back cleavage in order to spread the objectification amongst the sexes, thus diluting it by a tiny amount.

  35. Mike
    Mike March 31, 2012 at 10:37 pm |

    I just recently started reading Feministe (where have I been!? right?) and reading the first wave of comments on this article I thought this was going to be a feminist website in the same sense that Jezebel is feminist website.

    To the guys opining on boobs: please read Jadey’s comment, then re-read it, and actually internalize it, because that advice will save you so much time! (Trust me!)

    Love this website!

    [This has been a useless comment, brought to you by Another Dude.]

    1. Jordan S
      Jordan S April 1, 2012 at 3:55 pm |

      Firstly, it was a stupid not thought out comment, I got it.
      I have read all the posts and taken note.

      Some people cannot develop their ideas from just reading, and asking us to stop talking until we’re a perfect feminist is a bit harsh. These traps are easy to fall into, regardless of gender, and certainly not just on the topic of gender. One stupid comment doesn’t mean I, or any of the other guys (who have posted here) are the same as the rest who don’t even have an ounce of awareness. It certainly doesn’t mean we’ve never read feminist articles. I’ve been reading the articles here for a while, and doing my best to remember the things mentioned.

      In response to jadey’s comment about disconnecting our self-esteem – I don’t have any self esteem to disconnect. (as I’ve mentioned earlier). Not all guys have some inherent sense that they’re dominant, or better than women, or are “powerful”. My comment didn’t have any self esteem at all. I was simply trying to refute society’s views. Granted it was stupid. I got it. And the fact that I know it was stupid, makes me feel all the worse.

  36. Brandy
    Brandy April 1, 2012 at 7:17 am |

    bra. va.

    Heh.

  37. dashmagic
    dashmagic April 1, 2012 at 7:51 am |

    I for one say make every day cleavage day. In the dull drone office atmosphere of shades of gray and recirculated air… the occasional gift of cleavage is like a kiss by a rose on the gray.

  38. AMM
    AMM April 1, 2012 at 8:33 am |

    I was trying to think of what would be a male equivalent of “Cleavage Day” for men, and the best I could come was “Package Day”. With slogans like, “guys, be proud of your crotch bulge!” and “Wear tight pants to show you aren’t ashamed of your ‘manhood’ — and so everyone can see (and comment on) how well endowed you are [or aren't].”

    Guys, doesn’t this idea just sound so empowering? (I know men are already pretty empowered, relative to non-men, but who couldn’t use a bit more?)

  39. Jadey
    Jadey April 1, 2012 at 4:39 pm |

    *sigh*

    Okay, I’m annoyed at myself for continuing to get into this, but I will try one last time and then I’m going to stop contributing to the derail.

    Some people cannot develop their ideas from just reading, and asking us to stop talking until we’re a perfect feminist is a bit harsh.

    No one at all said anything like this – exaggeration is not helpful. But, yes, learning from seeing what other people do (and what mistakes other people make) is invaluable. If you can only learn by making all the mistakes yourself and not vicariously, then I’m going to suggest you need to work on on the perspective-taking part of empathy. Otherwise you will keep alienating people and taking away rather than giving back to the communities you try to participate in. (Yes, *your* learning can actually come at a cost to the people around you. Keep that in mind.) In which case, we actually are better off without you.

    It was more than one stupid comment, Jordan – it was a pattern of comments all the way through the thread, including this most recent one. The fact that you do not see how this most recent comment was as problematic as your first one (if not moreso) is cause for concern and reason enough for you to take a step back.

    I don’t have any self esteem to disconnect. (as I’ve mentioned earlier). Not all guys have some inherent sense that they’re dominant, or better than women, or are “powerful”. My comment didn’t have any self esteem at all. I was simply trying to refute society’s views. Granted it was stupid. I got it. And the fact that I know it was stupid, makes me feel all the worse.

    Yes, you do have a self-esteem. Even *low* self-esteem is still part of having a sense of self-esteem. And low self-esteem is not a justification or cover for any of your actions or comments. Many of us here struggle with low self-esteem in many domains of our lives. If you want to participate as an ally who contributes to a community rather than detracts from it, then it is imperative that you be able to take criticism and correction without turning the conversation into a discussion about how it makes *you* feel, regardless of what those feelings are. (Related reading from a different context: white women’s tears.) If you’re embarrassed, that’s a good thing – emotional reactions are part of how we learn. Use it as motivation.

    Privilege isn’t about having an innate sense of being more powerful and dominant. It’s about living in a society which endows you with that (relative) social position regardless of whether you seek it or not. What is up to you is the degree to which you exploit and feel entitled to that status. But you can’t make the privilege go away just by wanting it to or becoming enlightened about it, any more than a person could make their oppression go away by wanting.

    And I’m out.

  40. Azalea
    Azalea April 1, 2012 at 11:56 pm |

    Put me in the camp of women who are so heavy topped that cleavage occurs in ANY bra. I showed them off on Friday but theyve earned the right to some fresh air by the time I’ve left the office for the day. I really dont care who looks or what they think.

  41. Meropi
    Meropi April 2, 2012 at 4:20 am |

    Some people cannot develop their ideas from just reading, and asking us to stop talking until we’re a perfect feminist is a bit harsh. These traps are easy to fall into, regardless of gender, and certainly not just on the topic of gender. One stupid comment doesn’t mean I, or any of the other guys (who have posted here) are the same as the rest who don’t even have an ounce of awareness.

    That’s the thing that irks me the most. I felt you were one sentence short of asking the community to feel grateful for ‘imperfect’ contribution. Your ‘ounce of awareness’ entitles you to feel superior to the other grobian, unenlightened men out there. It should never come down to ‘cut me some slack, I’m not as bad as X’. That pretty much sums up your interaction with feminism, based on what you’ve displayed here. You get a personal sense of satisfaction from being aware of some issues, it helps you project yourself on a high moral pedestal and not part of the oppressing class and you pretty much made it clear in this last comment! Jadey summed it up very well in hir last paragraph. As long you persevere in this it will forever hinder your actual understanding of privilege and oppression.

  42. Crys T
    Crys T April 2, 2012 at 6:09 am |

    Too bad I missed this last week. Does ass cleavage count?

  43. Jadey
    Jadey April 2, 2012 at 11:10 am |

    I believe that since chest cleavage got its own day, it’s only fair that butt cleavage should have the same honor. April 3, y’all: National Coin Slot Day.

    *removes belt*

    *prepares for shiny windfall*

  44. Emily
    Emily April 2, 2012 at 12:03 pm |

    lol “National Coin Slot Day”
    Although the postings on this topic have addressed the absurdity of National Cleavage Day fairly well, I feel like this subject cannot truly be exhausted. At least not until something finally clicks in society and women are no longer reduced to specific parts of their bodies.
    That being said, this objectification is permeating through the generations at an alarming rate.
    There are padded bras and swimsuits in stores like Target, Wal-Mart, and Abercrombie and Fitch that are tailored for young girls.
    And I mean young like in the second grade.
    I don’t know about you all, but I didn’t start wearing a bra until I entered middle school.
    Why?
    Because I was a little girl! I didn’t have to!
    Encouraging little children to modify the appearance of their bodies because they aren’t “good enough” is sick. Girls have the rest of their lives to suffer from low self esteem and compare their bodies to others. Why start the process any earlier?
    Also, who are we trying to please here? At that age other children couldn’t care less what little girls look like. So who are the push up bras for? Pedophiles?
    Anyway I’m getting on a rant here. I just wanted to say that I think this “National Cleavage Day” is celebrating how far we have digressed as a society. Doesn’t sound like much fun to me.
    (an article about push up swim suits geared toward 7 year old girls: http://www.northwestohio.com/news/story.aspx?id=598093#.T3nX3lvLljs)

  45. Liz
    Liz April 2, 2012 at 12:37 pm |

    Men really need to think before they assume that simply by virtue of having a dick that gets hard, they’re handing out gold medals.

    Hear, hear!

    I was simply trying to refute society’s views.

    There are more than two choices most places in life; you don’t negate the first by buying into the second.

  46. Rob in CT
    Rob in CT April 2, 2012 at 3:18 pm |

    Woah, Emily… that’s beyond even some of the stuff my wife and I have noticed and diapproved of (like, say, the whole trend of writing across the butt of pants for little girls. To me, that’s on the same spectrum. Why are you looking at some little girl’s butt?). Ick.

    As for National Tits or GTFO day, what needed to be said has been said by others more qualified than I. :)

  47. Bitter Scribe
    Bitter Scribe April 2, 2012 at 3:24 pm |

    I might have a different perspective on this since I went to a symphony over the weekend where a gorgeous violinist with impeccable cleavage did a wonderful rendition of Mendelssohn’s Concerto. Let’s just say that when she bowed at the end, it added an extra little thrill to the experience.

  48. Mztress
    Mztress April 2, 2012 at 3:36 pm |

    “If you want to celebrate women, celebrate women, and if you want to celebrate boobs, celebrate boobs. But don’t try to scramble for some noble excuse to justify an act of perfectly understandable vanity.”

    Win. And ditto for “National Coin Slot Day.”

  49. flightless
    flightless April 2, 2012 at 4:38 pm |

    Bitter Scribe — how is “I enjoy looking at breasts!” a “different perspective on this”?

  50. Bitter Scribe
    Bitter Scribe April 2, 2012 at 4:44 pm |

    flightless – What I meant was, going to that particular concert gave me a slightly different perspective. Or reinforced a latent one, maybe.

  51. LotusBecca
    LotusBecca April 3, 2012 at 1:42 am |

    I don’t have any self esteem

    Jordan, maybe if you worked on gaining some self-esteem, you wouldn’t need to post kinda obnoxious and defensive comments when people give you helpful feedback and/or make fun of obtuse things you say. Just some food for thought.

  52. Crys T
    Crys T April 3, 2012 at 3:35 am |

    Yeah, April 3! Getting my coin slot ready for proud display!

    Bitter Scribe, why did you feel compelled to be such a douchenozzle?

  53. Crys T
    Crys T April 3, 2012 at 6:14 am |

    And btw, I’m interested in knowing exactly what defines an “impeccable” cleavage, as opposed to those that are less perfect.

    Tell us, oh Great Scribe.

  54. Bitter Scribe
    Bitter Scribe April 3, 2012 at 11:59 am |

    Crys T: Stick it in your coin slot.

  55. flightless
    flightless April 3, 2012 at 12:37 pm |

    But so then, Bitter Scribe, what *was* your new perspective? “I used to be against National Cleavage Day until I saw these great breasts on this one woman”? Or was it a more general “let’s sex up the violin industry” kind of stance? Because the only perspective you actually described in your comment was the looking-down-someone’s-shirt perspective.

  56. Xtina
    Xtina April 3, 2012 at 3:25 pm |

    flightless:

    Bitter Scribe might have been saying “I used to think cleavage was not okay, but cleavage and a concert has upgraded my opinion!”.  It’s hard to say, as it’s nearly indistinguishable from any given dude’s ogling.

  57. QLH
    QLH April 3, 2012 at 6:58 pm |

    What I meant was, going to that particular concert gave me a slightly different perspective. Or reinforced a latent one, maybe.

    Is your explanation of this perspective caught in moderation?

  58. samanthab
    samanthab April 4, 2012 at 11:32 am |

    I’m not a fan of Cleavage Day myself, but I’m really bothered by the idea that not covering your chest can only equal vanity. I’m supposed to be ashamed of the fact that I have breasts? By this logic, burkas have to be the ultimate feminist statement. Bodily shame=liberation? I’m not seeing how.

    I’m as flat as a board, and even I have cleavage when I wear camisoles on a hot day. But I’m not entitled to wear them without being judged as vain? And slut shamed, as I am here. (It’s okay to show your boobs to a single significant other. I have permission! Showing more than one person=ripe for judgment.)

    I’m sorry I’ve gone to the snippy side here, but this is not the first of Caperton’s posts to equate lack of bodily shame with vanity. I really don’t think dudes are judged this way for taking their shirts off.

  59. gamer
    gamer April 5, 2012 at 6:19 pm |

    This comic reminded me of this comment thread. Also, just about every other places where sexism+breasts is brought up. Exhausting.

  60. samanthab
    samanthab April 7, 2012 at 5:55 pm |

    Yeah, I’m full agreement once you’ve elaborated. Vanity and self-acceptance are roughly the same thing. And my reaction to Cleavage Day is no different. All I have to add is that a soft summer breeze close to the more sensitive parts of your body is another lovely reason to minimize clothing. I think those sheer physical delights are something to be embraced, also!

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