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Jill has been blogging for Feministe since 2005.
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6 Responses

  1. D.N. Nation
    D.N. Nation April 20, 2012 at 4:01 pm |

    Dads who also balance work and family mean working moms aren’t under quite as much pressure to be full-time employees and over-time parents, and so young women now can reasonably expect to have a fulfilling career and also be great moms. And dads, relieved of the burden to be the sole financial provider for their entire families, can recognize that their contributions to their kids can go far beyond the monetary, and include the tough but fulfilling emotional work of parenting, as well.

    I really like this paragraph; it hits close-ish to home. My wife is currently busting her ass in a PhD program and once she graduates will earn much more than me. She also hasn’t made more than a handful of meals for the two of us in the past four years. But I *love* cooking just as she *loves* the field she’s in, so it all works out. I’m not naive enough to think “follow your heart” is an end-all in these sorts of things, but I also know that we don’t define ourselves through artificial social constructs and so we’re happier.

  2. roro80
    roro80 April 20, 2012 at 5:20 pm |

    Jill, just dropping in to say that I really, really liked your guardian article. Great work.

  3. Faithless
    Faithless April 20, 2012 at 10:24 pm |

    are there any recent studies or new research on how policy changes that add expenses to existing business models like mandated private industry spending to provide child care options or healthcare mandates might affect single people without families?

    In short, if the cost of doing business rises due to encouragement for private institutions to fund family support structures, does where ever all that money comes from impact single household individuals in any way?

  4. Sunday Links Round-Up « ShoutOut! JMU

    [...] “an interesting article on Feministe about women in the workforce. As we prepare to graduate and embark on the next chapter [...]

  5. Nancy Green
    Nancy Green April 22, 2012 at 8:08 am |

    I figured out long ago that I shouldn’t be underpaid by my boss, who I don’t love, so that my husband, who I do love, has to work harder to pay the bills.

  6. Gerry Dorrian
    Gerry Dorrian April 22, 2012 at 9:32 am |

    When my wife was pregnant with our first of two children, we eventually decided that I would work and she stay at home on the basis that my job (nurse) attracted more wages than hers (hairdresser). Subsequently, she was growled at several times by women who somehow seemed to feel that she was betraying womanhood by being a stay-at-home mother. When I mentioned this to a woman I worked with, she suggested that the women doing the growling might be jealous.

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