Author: has written 8 posts for this blog.

Eve is one of the 2012 Summer team of guest bloggers. Her projects look like: @evesturges, www.themagpielist.com, www.cleanplates.com, happyhourstoryexperiment.tumblr.com, & papercutsandhummingbirds.wordpress.com. She lives with her daughter and boyfriend in Los Angeles and loves the color orange.
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31 Responses

  1. EG
    EG August 25, 2012 at 7:22 pm |

    You know, I feel so alienated by the “straight, cis, white guy as everyman/protagonist” that is the norm in movies and TV that I barely notice the alienation anymore. It’s just like “Oh, cool, a TV show set in 1864 NYC–about a white dude. Well, maybe there’ll be some cool supporting characters.”

    1. Nancy Green
      Nancy Green August 26, 2012 at 9:25 am |

      good point, Civil War times and the action is with the white guy

    2. Tara TASW
      Tara TASW August 26, 2012 at 11:01 am |

      The first episode of “Copper” reminded me of a headline (I’m sure it must have been The Onion): “Actress Wins Award for Playing a Character Who Isn’t a Prostitute.” Do writers not know that there are ANY other roles?

  2. DonnaL
    DonnaL August 25, 2012 at 7:35 pm |

    I didn’t need the tagline to find that trailer both depressing and alienating.

    Not that that kind of tagline is so unusual for almost any kind of movie. A variation of it is quite common — and equally annoying, for different reasons — in marketing, and in reviews, for movies with LGBT themes and characters. As in the “this movie isn’t about homosexuality, it’s about family!” kind of thing.

  3. shfree
    shfree August 25, 2012 at 7:45 pm |

    So, I think we saw the whole movie in the trailer, right? At least, all there is to it? Because I didn’t see one hint of a plot, other than “LOOK AT THESE WHITE PEOPLE.”

  4. LotusBecca
    LotusBecca August 25, 2012 at 7:48 pm |

    I think the trailer forget to include a part where big white lettering appears across the screen which reads: “This is cliche.” Let’s see. . .nagging wife; clueless, misogynistic husband; porn-loving, overeating stoner guy; vain, beautiful younger woman; bratty kids. Am I leaving anything out? Yeah. . .I mean, of course, I can’t relate very much to the heterosexual, cissexual rich married couples that exist in real life. I certainly can’t relate to them as they are ineptly depicted in the 40-Year-Old Virgin Part Ten.

  5. Gerry Dorrian
    Gerry Dorrian August 25, 2012 at 8:57 pm |

    cis bloke: first wrinkles on face late teens, grey hairs early twenties, fat by late twenties. I think I’ll leave this one too.

  6. Kaija24
    Kaija24 August 25, 2012 at 9:34 pm |

    Well…after watching that, I’m glad I cannot relate at all. No husband, no kids, no yearning for the youth I failed to misspend. Yes, I do suffer from the the occasional bout of ennui and wondering what might have been, but thank the FSM that it is not cliche and boring like that film. I’ll think about that next time I feel like spending a sunny day inside on the couch with the shades drawn eating popcorn in my underwear. :)

  7. Kaija24
    Kaija24 August 25, 2012 at 9:36 pm |

    Clarification: What was meant as “eating popcorn whilst wearing underwear” not “eating the popcorn that is inexplicably located in my underwear”…which would be unhygienic as well as itchy.

  8. Beauzeaux
    Beauzeaux August 25, 2012 at 11:58 pm |

    Hey, my forties werethe BEST. I mean, the BEST. I was at my peak in so many ways. My fifties were pretty cool too.

    This movie is aimed at YOUNG (under 30) people. People who are actually 40 would be out doing something interesting.

    1. Kaija24
      Kaija24 August 26, 2012 at 9:48 am |

      My mother says the exact same thing, that the 40s were her favorite decade…these are excellent and necessary messages to hear! :)

    2. Safiya Outlines
      Safiya Outlines August 26, 2012 at 3:51 pm |

      That is so good to hear and it’s a shame/conspiracy/wtf-ery that we don’t hear it more often.

  9. Liz
    Liz August 26, 2012 at 12:42 am |

    I have problems with Judd Apatow, but I love me some Chris O’Dowd.

    Here’s an Australian film which has him as one of the leads, but it’s the story of four Australian Indigenous women. It’s a problem that the trailer makes it look like the white bloke is teaching them how to be black. But, that doesn’t really reflect the film. It’s also written and directed by Indigenous men and is based on the life of the writer’s Mum. I know the writer and I’m rapt the film is doing so well. It’s been bought by the Weinsteins, so it’s getting a USA release sometime.

    1. Tamara
      Tamara August 27, 2012 at 6:29 pm |

      I just saw this in New Zealand last night. It was lovely! A feel good move with a lot of heart.

  10. Liza
    Liza August 26, 2012 at 1:51 am |

    The trailer reminded me of Desperate Housewives, where all protagonists are so thin and only supporting characters may look like real people.

    1. Bonn
      Bonn August 26, 2012 at 8:42 pm |

      I am thin and also a real person.

      1. Rach
        Rach August 27, 2012 at 11:59 am |

        Thank you, Bonn! I think we do just as much damage when we paint thin people as “not real people” as Hollywood/the media does when they refuse to acknowledge that anyone exists but thin, conventionally attractive people. All people are real and worthwhile people – thin, fat, tall, short, muscular, scrawny, conventionally attractive, not conventionally attractive, etc. Not a one of these is any more a real person than the others.

        *gets off soapbox*

  11. PeggyLuWho
    PeggyLuWho August 26, 2012 at 2:53 am |

    spending a sunny day inside on the couch with the shades drawn eating popcorn in my underwear. :)

    Or as I like to call it – Tuesdays.

    I know they (the folks who make films) like to think that these type are the “everyman” story, but really they’re the “validating my childfree single lifestyle choices by making the alternative seem so obnoxious” story.

  12. PeggyLuWho
    PeggyLuWho August 26, 2012 at 3:02 am |

    “validating my childfree single lifestyle choices by making the alternative seem so obnoxious”

    Not saying that I think that’s what the alternative is like in reality.

  13. Dank
    Dank August 26, 2012 at 6:18 am |

    It’s disturbingly easy to confuse “everyone” with “everyone I know”. In fact, I think that it’s one of the biggest issues facing our nation these days.

  14. Past my expiration date
    Past my expiration date August 26, 2012 at 7:00 am |

    The trouble, of course, is with the assumption that “everyone” will see some aspect of themselves in this story… a story which appears to be about a wildly wealthy (do you KNOW how much a house like that costs in LA?), white, American-born, middle-aged, thin, conventionally attractive, cissexual, child-rearing, married couple.

    On the other hand, I’m part of a middle-class, white, American-born, middle-aged, thin, not conventionally unattractive, cissexual, child-rearing, married couple, and this preview really (really really really (really)) isn’t even my story either.

  15. jp
    jp August 26, 2012 at 8:37 am |

    Gah! Both of those women (the lead & bra girl) are so painfully thin. The skull-noggin on the lead is really distressing.

    1. XtinaS
      XtinaS August 26, 2012 at 1:35 pm |

      jp:

      Gah! Both of those women (the lead & bra girl) are so painfully thin. The skull-noggin on the lead is really distressing.

      Way to make physical insults at women on a feminist blog.

  16. Anon
    Anon August 26, 2012 at 12:26 pm |

    I wonder whether the “this is everyone’s story” bit is meant to be aspirational–it may be, quite consciously, an invitation to those that aren’t rich, thin, married etc to come and see how the other “half” lives. The target audience may be, in addition to people actually living this story, twenty-somethings that hope that one day they will get married, get rich, and then look back on their twenties with longing. No less heavy-handed and offensive, of course, and definitely others broad swathes of the population, just maybe not a marketing disaster. Which makes it all the more icky, imho, in that it is selling this deeply awful vision of the future, instead of just laughing about the present.

    1. matlun
      matlun August 26, 2012 at 1:06 pm |

      I wonder whether the “this is everyone’s story” bit is meant to be aspirational–it may be, quite consciously, an invitation to those that aren’t rich, thin, married etc to come and see how the other “half” lives.

      I think it is just a reference to this being a film about mid life crisis which is a pretty general issue and something that could be “everyone’s story” in some larger artistic sense.

      Of course, considering the the actual trailer (or even just that this is a Judd Apatow film), I would be extremely surprised if it comes anywhere close to presenting an interesting perspective. So I just read it as over hyped marketing (or “a lie” to put it more bluntly).

  17. Jenny
    Jenny August 26, 2012 at 3:02 pm |

    Honestly, I think it looks funny and relevant to my interests.* But then, I’m a white cis upper-middle class professional who is engaged and planning to get married, buy a house, and have some kids (gods willing), so I do see your point, and I think the tagline is definitely stupid. I’m certainly nowhere near as thin or conventionally attractive as the movie people, but I never am, so it doesn’t really bother me.

    *One of my interests being: how do you and a partner deal with all the stresses of life and manage to still have some fun and avoid taking out anger, irritation, etc on each other?

  18. im
    im August 26, 2012 at 11:30 pm |

    Slight quibble: How much do we allow people to engage in tribalism? Because, obviously we don’t want to get people to completely abolish the ability to distinguish between self and other, but this does sound kind of overly specific in significant ways.

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