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14 Responses

  1. macavitykitsune
    macavitykitsune January 25, 2013 at 1:21 pm |

    Damn right! Good post. ^__^

  2. Lasciel
    Lasciel January 25, 2013 at 6:09 pm |

    Love all these posters.

  3. (BFing)Sarah
    (BFing)Sarah January 25, 2013 at 8:57 pm |

    I especially like the first poster because I swear that movie made me so mad I almost turned it off and most of the people I know LOVED it! They called it heart-warming even! I’m sorry, but it did not warm my heart. It depressed the shit out of me. I mean, at the end, the white woman gets a brand new exciting job…and a black woman is fired and walking off into the distance. Excuse me if that didn’t give me warm fuzzies!

    1. pheenobarbidoll
      pheenobarbidoll January 25, 2013 at 9:40 pm |

      Right? White Women Syndrome movies generally only serve to make white women feel the warm fuzzies.

    2. librarygoose
      librarygoose January 25, 2013 at 9:48 pm |

      I just read a review for a book that described the book as a cross of The Help and Beloved …I just sat back trying to imagine that.

    3. Jasmin
      Jasmin January 25, 2013 at 10:40 pm |

      My beef is with all the folks (looking at you, Jezebel) who tried to say Viola Davis playing a maid was a good thing because she’d win an Oscar and it’d open doors for more high-profile roles, because she’s “unknown”. Neither of those things happened (Wikipedia says she was in only film in 2012, in fact), so what now? How many times must black women mammy to make it?

  4. Margar
    Margar January 26, 2013 at 1:51 pm |

    I believe that is a Russian Constructivist poster- Futurism was an Italian movement.
    As a student of art history, I can see the impact -politically and socially- of art. After WWI there was an EXPLOSION of art movements bent on bettering and changing society- Dada, Futurism, de stijl, and on and on. But what I see as the real problem is the commodification of art and art images. Think about the gift shop in an art museum (and of course there are a few exceptions as always) are any of the things for sale there art? or are they full of kitsch and bad reproductions with the sole purpose of separating you from your money?

    1. macavitykitsune
      macavitykitsune January 27, 2013 at 7:04 pm |

      Think about the gift shop in an art museum (and of course there are a few exceptions as always) are any of the things for sale there art? or are they full of kitsch and bad reproductions with the sole purpose of separating you from your money?

      Right, because everyone who deeply admires a painting in a museum has the $500-odd to plunk down on the best reproductions. Talk about elitism.

    2. Li
      Li January 27, 2013 at 7:44 pm |

      But what I see as the real problem is the commodification of art and art images.

      I am genuinely curious as to when, as “a student of art history” you think art was not a commodity. Unless by “commodification” you mean “increasing accessibility of high art to people other than the rich”.

      1. Li
        Li January 27, 2013 at 8:09 pm |

        Addendum: “high art” is a deeply silly term that clearly needs to make up its mind as to what it actually wants to mean, but I’m tired and my caffeine hasn’t kicked in yet so I couldn’t be bothered coming up with an alternative. So take “high art” in this context to mean “art people will spend reasonable portions of time thinking of or describing as ‘high’, ‘proper’ ‘actual’ or ‘other legitimating synonym’ “.

  5. Nancy Green
    Nancy Green January 27, 2013 at 10:12 am |

    Business is a luxury, art is a necessity. Thanks for this great art history post. I’m watching the HBO series Treme on DVD and appreciating the fine and honest depiction of race and gender privilege and amazing music– New Orleans was a man-made disaster on top of a natural disaster.
    Alice Sheldon was a woman ahead of her time- would she have escaped her demons in this century, or just created different demons?

  6. Helen
    Helen January 27, 2013 at 6:48 pm |

    Thank goodness for radio, too. I just heard the story of Lawrence Otis Graham on “This American Life”. Oy. Post-racial? I don’t think so.

    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/173/three-kinds-of-deception

  7. Sweet Marmot
    Sweet Marmot February 2, 2013 at 3:52 am |

    Racism is for idiots.

  8. Sweet Marmot
    Sweet Marmot February 2, 2013 at 3:58 am |

    Racism is for the ignorant and inbred. Racist people know they are inferior, so they project that inferiority out onto others. They always pick qualities that a person can’t change to help them decide who the victims will be. That’s because they don’t want to have to earn the respect, or to run the risk their intended victim will earn the respect.

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