A quarter of men in some Asian countries admit to rape

Well here’s your depressing study of the day: A quarter of men in some Asian nations admit to rape; more than half committed their first rape as teenagers. The vast majority of rapists — been 72 and 97 percent — faced no legal consequences. And men rape because, well, they feel entitled to sex and to women’s bodies:

The most common motivation that men cited for rape was related to sexual entitlement — a belief that men have a right to have sex with women regardless of consent. Over 80 per cent of men who admitted to rape in rural Bangladesh and China gave this response.

That’s a key finding in rape prevention. Cultures where men feel sexually entitled to sex and to women’s bodies, and where men have many opportunities to interact with women, are cultures where sexual assault rates remain extraordinarily high. That’s why most feminists take a holistic view of bodily integrity and sexual rights — issues like state interference in reproduction, blocking access to contraception, abortion rights, coercive sterilization, cat-calling, unwanted touching, street harassment and sexual assault are all intertwined. When women are imaged as the “holders” of sex and men as the “getters,” and when women simultaneously have less power and are idealized as submissive and servile to male partners, you have a culture that enables and excuses rape.

Author: has written 5289 posts for this blog.

Jill has been blogging for Feministe since 2005.
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8 Responses

  1. Wordwizard
    Wordwizard September 10, 2013 at 11:15 am |

    As if that isn’t depressing enough, rape in relationships made up the majority of those cases, with just one in 10 saying they had raped a woman who is not their wife or girlfriend. Ten thousand men from six countries (Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, China, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh) participated in the survey. Nearly three quarters of those who had raped said they did so due because of “sexual entitlement,” and the second most common motivation was “entertainment.”

    The BBC article has details I didn’t find in other write-ups, including the press release.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-24021573

  2. gwyllion
    gwyllion September 10, 2013 at 12:13 pm |

    AND there was THIS on Crooks and Liars today:

    http://www.examiner.com/article/yemen-8-year-old-girl-dies-from-internal-injuries-on-wedding-night

    not just women – girls and infants

    1. Jamie
      Jamie September 12, 2013 at 9:28 am |

      Welp. I’m moving to the moon.

      1. Willemina
        Willemina September 12, 2013 at 10:08 am |

        But then Newt Gingrich will be your president, and ya know how that goes.

  3. Tony
    Tony September 10, 2013 at 3:34 pm |
    1. DannyChameleon
      DannyChameleon September 10, 2013 at 3:47 pm |

      Yes. Also, thank you.

  4. Iamabanana
    Iamabanana September 11, 2013 at 2:24 am |

    I was very interested in women’s issues when I was living in Japan (and I still am, but I’m just not in Japan anymore). I found that there was this awful pile of issues that sort of crammed together–that husbands/boyfriends didn’t care about consent, that abortions were prohibitively expensive and did require the father’s consent, and that women would basically make the same salary their entire lives while men’s salaries would continue to increase with age. Add in that married women are often nudged (and nudged hard) into quitting their jobs, and the situation just gets worse.

    So you can’t really say no to your partner, you probably can’t afford an abortion without his help (and you need his permission anyhow), and on top of that there’s also this idea that if the man can afford it, you’re supposed to have the baby regardless. NHI doesn’t cover any of this (pill, pregnancy, abortion) because it’s considered “self-inflicted” if you’re pregnant, so you’re in deeper sh1t if you’re single (let’s not even get started on the situation for single parents), though the pill’s not very popular there anyway because it was only legalized recently and people still think it’ll just make them fat and won’t take it. (And then we add another layer to it all–the diet industry in Japan does pretty despite being a country boasting a low obesity rate.)

    Really doesn’t surprise me to hear that things are similar in nearby countries. Not that the US is any moral high ground on abortion or marital rape, but at least I think a good amount of American women feel empowered to say “no.” How do you say “no” if you don’t feel that you’re allowed to?

    Oh, and then guys would wonder why women hated sex and never wanted to have it. Go figure. It’s hard to do/say anything as an outsider, so I will just hope that something happens at some point and people figure this all out.

  5. 'Abortion Is Like Slavery' and Other Offensive Anti-Choice Analogies

    […] the same logic—that women exist to be used by other people and not for their own purposes—underpins both rape apologetics and abortion bans. No wonder so many anti-choicers tend to take a cavalier attitude when it comes […]

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