Category: Race & Ethnicity

Student who smeared bodily fluids on her roommate’s belongings gets special probation. Not included: Any other meaningful penalty.

Brianna Brochu appears in court to answer charges that she contaminated her then-roommate's belongings with bodily fluids

Brianna Brochu, who was expelled from the University of Hartford after contaminating her roommate’s belongings with blood, rancid food, and ass bacteria, has had her day in court. The verdict? Guilty of breach of peace and criminal mischief. The sentence? Two hundred hours of community service, and if she’s a good girl, her charges will be thrown out and she won’t have a criminal record for rubbing used tampons on her roommate’s backpack and (as she claimed on social media but later Read more →

Black Panther Open Thread

Shot from "Black Panther" of three women in African dress against a rocky background -- Florence Kasumba as Ayo, Lupita Nyong'o as Nakia, and Danai Gurira as Okoye

HOLY SHIT, Y’ALL. So I saw Black Panther last night. My reactions, in no particular order: – It was visually stunning. Literally. I was stunned at the visuals. – The story held up the whole way through. I can count…

While We Were Out: Ivanka Trump “All Lives Matter”-ed Black History Month

Jared Kushner, in a tux, and Ivanka Trump, in a floor-length silver gown, pose in front of a mirror the day after Donald Trump issued his Muslim ban

Feministe was recently down with technical issues, so of course that’s when Ivanka Trump would unload the dual Twitter turd of underscoring her father’s flat-out incompetence and super-duper racism in issues relating to equality, dignity, opportunity, and/or race whilst negating the “Black” part of Black History Month. In celebration of Black History Month, of course.

Alabama Senate election open thread

Doug and Louise Jones stand on stage amid a cloud of confetti after Doug's victory in the Alabama Senate special election Dec. 12

On Tuesday night, something momentous happened: The people of Alabama elected a Democratic senator for the first time in over 25 years. By the tiniest of margins — 49.9 percent to 48.4 percent — voters picked Doug Jones over disgraced judge and accused child molester Roy Moore. So there’s a lot to discuss there.

What men need to know about discussing sexual harassment

A shot from Game of Thrones with Arya and Sansa Stark standing on the snow-frosted battlements of Winterfell

I was talking with a group of guy friends recently, the sole woman amid a collection of dudes as they stream-of-consciousness workshopped their way to understanding the ongoing storm of sexual harassment accusations. It’s not a pleasant position to be in — I was glad to be able to help them understand things, but thinking about that stuff at that level and having to articulate it that way was exhausting and also made me want to go home and take, like, twelve showers. But they and others have asked what they need to know and what insights they need to have when discussing sexual harassment with women. So here’s some.

Quick Hit: Trump fails to not be racist as he “honors” Native American code talkers

Donald Trump stands in the Oval Office, in front of a portrait of Andrew Jackson, with two Navajo code talkers for a ceremony honoring them on Monday, November 28, 2017.

On Monday, Donald Trump once again gave it the ol’ college try to not be racist at a special event. He failed, because he is constitutionally unable to not be a racist asshole any time he stands in front of people without a script. This time, it was an event to honor World War II Native American code talkers, which wouldn’t be complete if he didn’t invoke the name of Pocahontas as a slur.

Yes, Trump attacks white guys. That doesn’t mean he isn’t a bigot.

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 28: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to deliver an address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on February 28, 2017 in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Trump's first address to Congress is expected to focus on national security, tax and regulatory reform, the economy, and healthcare. (Photo by Jim Lo Scalzo - Pool/Getty Images)

Anyone who ever predicted that we’d have a president who was celebrated for being an equal-opportunity asshole, stop lying, because there’s no way you predicted anything that specific. But that’s what we’ve got. Our president, who’s a fighter! and who’s going to hit back! and the people knew what they were getting into when they voted for him! might be a complete and utter dickhole, but he’s not a bigoted dickhole because he’s a dickhole to everyone.

The sacred institution of protest

They aren’t protesting the flag or the anthem. It isn’t about the flag or the anthem. And if you’re more upset about the way they’re protesting than you are about the reason they have to protest, that’s not about them or the flag or the troops or America — that’s about you.

Four non-Confederate-general ways to not forget history

Confederate statue enthusiasts have argued that removal of such statues amounts to an erasure of history, and that they have to remain to remind us of how bad slavery is. But believe it or not, there are ways to memorialize difficult, painful, and contentious parts of history without glorifying, for instance, generals who led the wrong side of a war to perpetuate slavery. Birmingham’s Kelly Ingram Park provides several examples of different ways to do this with statues and sculptures memorializing the Civil Rights movement. Individually and collectively, they send the message that bigotry is bad, and equality is good, and fighting for freedom is noble, all without putting a single Confederate general on a literal pedestal.

Yes, this is America.

This isn’t how we want America to be. This doesn’t fit into the ideals we have for America. This isn’t how we see America when we squint at it like we’re looking at a Magic Eye painting whenever reality gets scary or disappointing. But it’s America.

Let’s talk about Confederate monuments.

They’re going down. Some of them are, anyway. But they’re not going down without a fight from the heritage-not-hate devotees of the tributes to the fight to preserve slavery and white supremacy. New Orleans has taken down statues honoring Confederate generals and leaders, and Charlottesville has voted to do the same. But just as quickly as the statues are falling, city and state governments are proposing protections for such monuments as a matter of “heritage.” Alabama passed theirs on Friday, and Louisiana’s is in the works.

So what’s really behind this desperate protectiveness of Civil War participation trophies, and why do they have no place on taxpayer-owned land? Let’s talk.