Tag Archives: CIF

Have you deodorized your under-boobs today?

You know, to get rid of swoob (sweat-boob). Yes, the idea of boob deodorant might make you titter, but it’s a real thing an actual company is marketing. And that says a lot about our beauty industry. Continue reading

Posted in Beauty, Body image, Discrimination, Economics, Feminism | Tagged , , | 70 Comments

I’m glad Lena Dunham gets naked on Girls

Season 3 of HBO’s Girls premiered Sunday night, Lena Dunham is on the cover of next month’s Vogue, and after a reporter from The Wrap asked her why she gets naked so often everyone is talking about how often Lena Dunham gets naked. So I am too! Over at the Guardian, I say that Girls is an imperfect show, but Dunham’s nudity is powerful: Not just because she looks more like the average American woman than most women on television, but because her nakedness isn’t primarily ornamental, purposed for titillation and aspiration. Continue reading

Posted in Advertising, Beauty, Body image, Celebrity, Entertainment, Gender, Media & Media Literacy, Popular Culture | Tagged , , , , | 74 Comments

Sexual regret is about culture, not evolution.

Women are more likely to regret casual sexual encounters than men. Is that because women are evolutionarily predisposed to feel shame after sex? A team of UCLA evolutionary psychologists says yes. I say no:
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Posted in Feminism, Gender, GLBTQ, Rape Culture, Reproductive Rights, Sex, Sexual Assault | Tagged , , , | 24 Comments

Where are the women’s voices on Syria?

When it comes to “hard” news issues like foreign policy and national security, male voices dominate. It’s not because there aren’t women with views and opinions though — it’s because we read more competence and authority into the male voice, and we socialize women out of feeling that they’re entitled to an opinion. In the Guardian:
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Posted in Discrimination, Gender, Politics | Tagged , | 116 Comments

The Consequences of “Opting Out”

It’s nice to say that working or not working is simply a matter of personal choice, but in reality it’s a highly gendered one — and one that puts women at a disadvantage when it comes to stability, equality and independence. Continue reading

Posted in Domesticity, Marriage, Parenthood, relationships, Work | Tagged , , , | 141 Comments

A love letter to traveling alone

A very different sort of writing than I usually do at the Guardian, but hey, trying out something new this week: Why you should travel alone, even if it’s just around the block. Continue reading

Posted in Life | Tagged , , , | 31 Comments

Kate Middleton and Moms Who Aren’t Princesses

With much of England and half the U.S. on Kate Middleton Baby-Watch this week, I’m writing about motherhood in the Guardian. It’s great (and normal) that we’re all excited about a new (and royal!) baby. Babies are really cute, and all of them should enter the world into the arms of folks who are excited to welcome them. But our celebrity pregnancy obsession, coupled with our unrealistic and condescending view of motherhood (it’s THE HARDEST JOB IN THE WOOOOORLD!) make real political change difficult, and keep parents (mostly mothers) unsupported. A bit:
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Posted in Celebrity, Class, Feminism, Gender, Marriage, Parenthood, Politics, Popular Culture, Poverty, Pregnancy, Reproductive Rights | Tagged , | 23 Comments

Serena Williams and blaming rape victims

Earlier this week, Serena Williams made some seriously victim-blamey statements about the Steubenville Jane Doe. She apologized, but the apology wasn’t exactly spot-on. I wrote about it in my Guardian column this week, arguing that Williams’ comments were beyond the pale, but they’re part of a bigger cultural problem. The full piece is here; a snippet is below the fold. Continue reading

Posted in Gender, Politics, Popular Culture, Rape Culture, Reproductive Rights, Sexual Assault, Sports | Tagged , , , , | 51 Comments

The rise of female breadwinners, and the betrayals of U.S. policy

Over at the Guardian, I’m writing about the new stat that 40% of breadwinners in American families are women. With women making up half the workforce, it shouldn’t be a surprise that we’re an increasing proportion of primary earners. But the 40% stat doesn’t tell the whole story. For starters, the majority of that 40% are single moms — the breadwinners in their families, yes, but not because they’re married to men who make less. Those women make an average of $23,000 per year. The third of breadwinner women who are married to men are significantly wealthier, with a combined family income averaging $80,000. And when you look at divorce and marital satisfaction stats, the happiest couples are those who both work, but where the husband makes more money. Stay-at-home moms have higher rates of depression and marital dissatisfaction, and unhappiness comes in again at the end of the spectrum where a wife out-earns her husband. A strong majority of Americans also believe that the best situation for a child is with a mom who stays home (only 8 percent believe the same about a kid with a dad who stays home). These problems are complex, but traditional ideas about gender play a strong role, and those ideas shape the social policies that leave working parents between a rock and a hard place. Our particularly American gender traditionalism coupled with our idealization of individualism-as-freedom (without recognition that such individualism has generally been a male pursuit, enabled entirely by an unpaid female at-home support system) creates major cultural disincentives to implementing the kids of policies that could actually help families. The full piece is here, and a section is below: Continue reading

Posted in Class, Domesticity, Economics, Feminism, Gender, Health, Life, Marriage, Parenthood, Politics, Work | Tagged , | 82 Comments

Leave Amanda Bynes alone; look at yourself instead

I’m writing about Amanda Bynes’ very public breakdown at the Guardian, and what the media coverage says about American views on beautiful women: Continue reading

Posted in Beauty, Celebrity, Crime, Entertainment, Media & Media Literacy, Popular Culture, Sexual Assault | Tagged , | 22 Comments

Purity Culture and Sexual Assault

Caperton covered the Elizabeth Smart speech about abstinence already, and my Guardian column this week is on a similar topic: How an emphasis on purity is bad for women, bad for men and bad for rape survivors:
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Posted in Class, Feminism, Gender, Marriage, Politics, Rape Culture, relationships, Religion, Reproductive Rights, Sex, Sexual Assault | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Adria Richards, Sexual Assault and Victim-Blaming

Over at the Guardian, I’m writing about Adria Richards, and how victim-blaming for cyber harassment parallels victim-blaming in rape cases:

Of course it’s possible to disagree with Richards’ actions while still focusing on the real problem: misogyny online and in tech spaces. But it’s really not possible to pontificate at length on what Richards should have done without obscuring the fact that when women speak out, we’re met with rape threats.

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Posted in Discrimination, Feminism, Gender, Race & Ethnicity, Racism, Rape Culture, Sexual Assault, Work | Tagged , , , | 32 Comments